Meraki Is Almost An Enterprise Solution


You may remember a three or so years ago when I famously declared that Meraki is not a good solution for enterprises. I know the folks at Meraki certainly haven’t. The profile for the hardware and services has slowly been rising inside of Cisco. More than just wireless with the requisite networking components, Meraki has now embraced security, SD-WAN, and even security cameras. They’ve moved into a lot of areas that customers have been asking about while also still trying to maintain the simplicity that Meraki is known for.

Having just finished up a Meraki presentation during Tech Field Day Extra at Cisco Live Europe, I thought it would be a good time to take a look at the progress that Meraki has been making toward embracing their enterprise customer base. I’m not entirely convinced that they’ve made it yet, but the progress is starting to look good.

Playing for Scale

The first area where Meraki is starting to really make strides is in the scalability department. This video from Tech Field Day Extra is all about new security features in the platform, specifically with firewalls. Take a quick look:

Toward the end of the video is one of the big things I got excited about. Meraki has introduced rule groups into their firewall platform. Sounds like a strange thing to get excited about, right? Kind of funny how the little things end up mattering in the long run. The real reason I’m getting excited about it has nothing to do with the firewall or even the interface. It has everything to do with being scalable.

One of the reasons why I’ve always seen Meraki as a solution that is more appropriate for small businesses is the lack of ability to scale. Meraki’s roots as a platform built for small deployments means that the interface has always been focused on making it easy to configure. You may remember from my last post that I wasn’t a fan of the way everything felt like it was driven through deployment wizards. Hand holding me through my first firewall deployment is awesome. Doing it for my 65th deployment is annoying. In enterprise solutions I can easily script or configure this via the command line to avoid the interface. But Meraki makes me use the UI to get it done.

Enterprises don’t run on wizards. They don’t work with assistance turned on. Enterprises need scalability. They need to be able to configure things to run across dozens or hundreds of devices quickly and predictably. They need that to happen quickly, too. Sure, it may only take four minutes to configure something via the firewall. Now, multiply that by 400 devices. Just that one little settings going to take over 26 hours to configure. And that’s assuming you don’t need to take time for a break or to sleep. When you’re working at the magnitude of an enterprise, those little shortcuts matter.

You might be saying right now, “But what about policies and groups for devices?” You would be right that groups can definitely speed up the process. But how many groups do you think the average enterprise would have for devices? I doubt all routers or switches or firewalls would conveniently fit into a single group. Or even ten groups. And there’s always the possibility that a policy change among those groups may get implemented correctly nine times out of those ten. The tenth time it gets an error that could still affect hundreds of devices. You see how this could get out of hand.

That’s why I’m excited about the little things like firewall groups. It means that Meraki is starting to see that these things need to be programmatically done. Building a series of policies in software makes it easy to deploy over and over again through scripting or enhanced device updating. Polices are good for rules. They’re not so good for devices. So the progress means that Meraki needs to keep building toward letting us script these deployments and updates across the entire organization.

Hextuple Option

The other thing that’s neatly buried at the end of the video is courtesy of a question from my friend Jody Lemoine (@GhostInTheNet). He points out that there are IPv6 addresses on the dashboard. The Meraki presenters confirm that they are testing IPv6 support natively and not just in bridged mode. Depending on when you read this post in the future, it may even be out already. You know that I’m an IPv6 fan and I’ve been tough on Meraki in the past about their support for it. So I’m happy to see that it’s in the works.

But more importantly I’m pleased that Meraki has jumped into a complex technical solution with both feet. Enterprises don’t need a basic set of services. They don’t want you to just turn on the twenty most common settings. Enterprises need odd things sometimes. They need longer VPN lifetimes or weird routing LSA support. Sometimes they need to do the really odd things because their thousand-odd devices really have to have this feature turned on to make it work.

Now, I’ve rightfully decried the idea that you should just do whatever your customers want, but the truth is that doing something silly for one customer isn’t the same as doing it for a dozen or more that are asking for a feature. Meraki has always felt shy to me about the way they implement features in their software. It’s almost the opposite of Cisco, in a way. Cisco is happy to include corner-case options on software releases on a whim to satisfy million-dollar customers. Meraki, on the other hand, has seemed to wait until well past critical mass to turn something on. It almost feels like you have to break down their door to get something advanced enabled.

To me, IPv6 is the watershed. It’s something that the general public doesn’t think they need or doesn’t know they really should have. Cisco has had IPv6 support in IOS for years. Meraki has been dragging along until they feel the need to implement it. But implementing it in 2020 makes me feel they will finally start implementing features in a way that makes sense for users. Hopefully that also means they’ll be more responsive to their Make A Wish feature requests and start indexing how many customers really want a certain feature or certain option enabled.

Napoleon Complex

The last thing that I’ll say about the transformation of Meraki is about their drive to embrace complexity. I know that Russ White and I don’t always see eye-to-eye about complexity. But I feel that hiding it is ultimately detrimental to IT staff members. Sure, you don’t want the CEO or the janitor in the wireless system deploying new SSIDs on a daily basis or disabling low data rates on APs. But you also need to have access to those features when the time comes. That was one of my big takeaways in my previous Meraki post.

I know that Meraki prides themselves on having a clean, easy-to-use interface. I know that it’s going to take a while before Meraki starts exposing their interface to power users. But, it also took Microsoft a long time to let people start doing massive modifications via PowerShell. Or Apple letting users go wild under the hood. These platforms finally opened a little and let people do some creative things. Sure, Apple IOS is still about as locked down as Meraki is, but every WWDC brings some new features that can be tinkered with here and there. I’m not expecting a fully complexity-embracing model in the next couple of years from Meraki, but I feel that the right people internally are starting to understand that growth comes in the form of enterprise customers. Enterprises don’t shy away from complexity. They don’t want it hidden. They want to see it and understand it and plan for it. And, ultimately, embrace it.


Tom’s Take

I will freely admit that I’m hard on the Meraki team. I do it because I see potential. I remember seeing them for the first time all the way back at Wireless Field Day 2 in their cramped San Francisco townhome office. In the years since the Cisco acquisition they’ve grown immensely with talent and technology. The road to becoming something more than you start out doing isn’t easy. And sometimes you need someone willing to stop you now and then and tell you where directions make more sense. I don’t believe for one moment that my armchair quarterbacking has really had a significant impact on the drive that Meraki has to get into larger enterprises. But I hope that my perspective has shown them how the practitioners of the world think and how they’re slowly transforming to meet those needs and goals. Hopefully in the next couple of years I can write the final blog post in this trilogy when Meraki embraces the enterprise completely.

1 thought on “Meraki Is Almost An Enterprise Solution

  1. Meraki will never be an Enterprise solution whilst they tream their customers like dirt. We waited over a year for a critical bug to be fixed in their MR32 access points, meanwhile we couldn’t upgrade. And every time we called for a different problem, the advice was to upgrade. Great, yes please, I would love to lose my roaming functionality so you can fix a different bug.
    Now moving a different wifi provider, who actually care about their customers.

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