Eventually Secure?


I have a Disney+ account. I have kids and I like Star Wars, so it made sense. I got it all set up the day it came out and started binge watching the Mandalorian. However, in my haste to get things up and running I reused an old password instead of practicing good hygiene. As the titular character might scold me, “This is not the way.” I didn’t think anything about it until I got a notification that someone from New Jersey logged into my account.

I panicked and reset my password like a good security person should have done in the first place. I waited for the usual complaints that people had been logged out of the app and prepared to log everyone in again and figure out how to remove my New Jersey interloper. Imagine my surprise when no one came to ask me to turn Phineas and Ferb back on. Imagine my further surprise when I looked in the app and on the Disney+ website and couldn’t find a way to see which devices were logged in to this account. Nor could I find a way to disconnect a rogue device as I could with Netflix or Hulu.

I later found out that this functionality exists but you have to call the Disney+ support team to make it happen. I also have no doubts that the functionality will eventually come to the app as more and more people are sharing account information so they can binge watch Clone Wars. However, this eventual security planning has me a bit concerned. And that concern extends beyond Mice and Mandalorians.

Minimum Secure Product

If you’re figuring out how to secure your newest application or a new building or even just a new user, you first have to figure out what “secure” looks like. If you have trouble figuring that out, all you need to do is look at your closest competitor. They will usually have a good baseline of the security and accessibility features you should have.

Maybe it’s basic device and user controls like the Disney+ example above. Maybe it’s encryption of your traffic end-to-end, as Zoom learned a couple of weeks ago. Or maybe it’s something as simple as ensuring that you don’t have a hard-coded backdoor password for SSH, like Fortinet remembered earlier this year. The real point is that you can survey the landscape and figure out what you need to do to make your product or app meet a minimum standard.

On the extremely off-chance that you’re developing something new and unique and never-before-seen in the world, you have a different problem. For one, you need to chill on the marketing. Maybe you’re using something in a novel and different way. But unless you’ve developed psychic powers or anti-gravity boosters or maybe teleportation you haven’t come up with anything completely unique. Secondly, you still have some references to draw on. You can look for similar things and use similar security controls.

If your teleport requires a login by a qualified person to operate you should look at login security for other industries that are similar to determine what is appropriate. Maybe it’s like a medical facility where you have two-factor authentication (2FA) with smart cards or tokens as well as passwords or biometrics. Maybe it’s a lockout system with two operators required to engage the mechanism so someone’s arm doesn’t actually get teleported away without the rest of them. Even if your teleport produces massive amounts of logs you should keep them lest someone show up on the other pad with a different color hair than when they left. Those logs may be different from anything ever seen before, but even Airbus knows how to store the flight data from every A380 flight.

Security isn’t a hard problem. It’s a series of challenges that must be overcome. All of them are rooted in common sense and discovery. Sure, you may not know all the problems right now. But you know what they look like in general and you also know what the outcome should look like. Common sense comes into play when you start thinking like a bad actor. If I were able to get into this app, what would I want to do? Maybe I want to sign up for the all-inclusive package and not get a confirmation sent to an account. So put a control in place that makes you confirm that. Sure, it reduces the likelihood that someone is going to sign up for something without realizing what they’ve done. But the side effect is that you also have happier customers because they were stopped from doing something they may not have wanted to do. Your security controls served a double purpose.


Tom’s Take

Ultimately, security should be about preventing bad or unwanted outcomes. Theft, destruction, and impersonation are all undesired outcomes of something. If your platform doesn’t protect against those you are not secure. If your process requires intervention to make those outcomes happen you’re not there yet. Disney+ could have launched with device reports and the ability to force logoff after password change. But the developers were focused on other things. It’s time for developers to learn how to examine what the minimum requirements are to be secure and ensure they’re included in the process along the way. We shouldn’t have to hope that we might one day become eventually secure.

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