Getting In Front of Future Regret


Yesterday I sat in on the keynote from Commvault Connections21 and participated in a live blog of it on Gestalt IT. There was a lot of interesting info around security, especially related to how backup and disaster recovery companies are trying to add value to the growing ransomware issue in global commerce. One thing that I did take away from the conversation wasn’t specifically related to security though and I wanted to dive into a bit more.

Reza Morakabati, CIO for Commvault, was asked what he thought teams needed to do to advance their data strategy. And his response was very insightful:

Ask your team to imagine waking up to hear some major incident has happened. What would their biggest regret be? Now, go to work tomorrow and fix it.

It’s a short, sweet, and powerful sentence. Technology professionals are usually focused on implementing new things to improve productivity or introduce new features to users and customers. We focus on moving fast and making people happy. Security is often seen as running counter to this ideal. Security wants to keep people safe and secure. It’s not unlike the parents that hold on to their child’s bicycle after the training wheels come off just to make sure the kids are safe. The kids want to ride and be free. The parents aren’t quite sure how secure they’re going to be just yet.

Regret Storming

Thought exercises make for entertaining ways to scare yourself to death some days. If you spend too much time thinking about all the ways that things can go wrong you’re going to spend far too much energy focused on the negative aspects of your work. However, you do need to occasionally open yourself up to the likelihood that things are going to go wrong at some point.

For the thought exercise above, it’s not crucial to think about how they could go wrong. It’s more important to think about what could be the worst thing that could happen as a result of those bad things and how much you’ll regret it. You need to identify those areas and try to figure out how they can be mitigated.

Let me give you a specific example from my area. In May 2013 a massive tornado ripped through Moore, OK just north of where I live. It was a tragic event that had loss of life. People were displaced and homes and businesses were destroyed. One of the places that was damaged severely was the Moore Public Schools administration building. In the aftermath of trying to clean up the debris and find survivors, one of my friends that worked for an IT vendor told me he spent hours helping sift through the rubble of the building looking for hard disk drives for the district’s servers. Why? Because the tornado had struck just before the payroll for the district’s teachers and staff was due to be run. Without the drives they couldn’t run payroll or print paychecks for those employees. With an even greater need to have funds to pay for food or start repairs on their homes you can imagine that not getting paid was going to be a big deal for those educators and staff.

There are a lot of regrets that came out of the May 2013 tornado. Loss of life and loss of property are always at the top of the list. The psychological damage of enduring something like that is also a huge impact. But for the school district one of the biggest regrets they faced was not having a contingency plan for what to do about paying their employees to help them deal with the disaster. It sounds small in comparison to the millions of dollars of damage that happened but it also represents something important that can be controlled. The school system can’t upgrade the warning system or build businesses that can withstand the most powerful storms imaginable. But they can fix their systems to prevent teachers from going without resources in the event of an emergency.

In this case, the regret is not being able to pay teachers if the district data center goes down. How could we fix that regret today if we had imagined it beforehand? We could have migrated the data center to the cloud so no one weather event could take it out. Likewise, we could have moved to a service that provides payroll entry and check printing that could be accessed from anywhere. We could also have encouraged our teachers and employees to use direct deposit functions to reduce the need to physically print checks. Technology today provides us with a number of solutions to the regret we face. We can put together plans to implement any one of them quickly. We just need to identify the problem and build a resolution for it.

Building Your Future

It’s not easy to foresee every possible outcome. Nor should it be. But if you focus on the feelings those unknown outcomes could bring you’ll have a much better sense for what’s important to protect and how to go about doing it. Are you worried your customer data is going to be stolen and shared on the Internet? Then you need to focus your efforts on protecting it. Are you concerned your AWS bill is going to skyrocket if someone steals your credentials and starts borrowing your resource pool? Then you need to have governance in place to prevent unauthorized users from doing that thing.

You don’t have to have a solution for every possible regret. You may even find that some of the things you thought you might end up regretting are actually pretty mild. If you’re not concerned about what would happen to your testing environment because you can just clone it from a repository then you can put that to bed and not worry about it any longer. Likewise, you may discover some regrets you didn’t anticipate. For example, if you’re using Active Directory credentials to back up your server data, you need to make sure you’re backing up Active Directory as well. You’re going to find yourself infuriated if you have the data you need to get back to business but it’s locked behind cryptographic locks that you can’t open because someone forgot to back up a domain controller.


Tom’s Take

I’ve been told that I’m somewhat negative because I’m always worried about what could go wrong with a project or an event. It’s not that I’m a pessimist as much as I’ve got a track record for seeing how things can go off the rails. Thanks to Commvault I’m going to spend more time thinking of my regrets and trying to plan for them to be mitigated ahead of time so all the possible ways things could fail won’t consume my thoughts. I don’t have to have a plan for everything. I just need to get in front of the regrets before I feel them for real.

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