Linux and the Quest for Underlays


TuxUnderlay

I’m at the OpenStack Summit this week and there’s a lot of talk around about building stacks and offering everything needed to get your organization ready for a shift toward service provider models and such. It’s a far cry from the battles over software networking and hardware dominance that I’m so used to seeing in my space. But one thing came to mind that made me think a little harder about architecture and how foundations are important.

Brick By Brick

The foundation for the modern cloud doesn’t live in fancy orchestration software or data modeling. It’s not because a retailer built a self-service system or a search engine giant decided to build a cloud lab. The real reason we have a growing market for cloud providers today is because of Linux. Linux is the underpinning of so much technology today that it’s become nothing short of ubiquitous. Servers are built on it. Mobile operating systems use it. But no one knows that’s what they are using. It’s all just something running under the surface to enable applications to be processed on top.

Linux is the vodka of operating systems. It can run in a stripped down manner on a variety of systems and leave very little trace behind. BSD is similar in this regard but doesn’t have the driver support from manufacturers or the ability to strip out pieces down to the core kernel and few modifications. Linux gives vendors and operators the flexibility to create a software environment that boots and gets basic hardware working. The rest is up to the creativity of the people writing the applications on top.

Linux is the perfect underlay. It’s a foundation that is built upon without getting in the way of things running above it. It gives you predictable performance and a familiar environment. That’s one of the reasons why Cumulus Networks and Dell have embraced Linux as a way to create switch operating systems that get out of the way of packet processing and let you build on top of them as your needs grow and change.

Break The Walls Down

The key to building a good environment is a solid underlay, whether it be be in systems or in networking. With reliable transport and operations taken care of, amazing things can be built. But that doesn’t mean that you need to build a silo around your particular area of organization.

The shift to clouds and stacks and “new” forms of IT management aren’t going to happen if someone has built up a massive blockade. They will work when you build a system that has common parts and themes and allows tools to work easily on multiple parts of the infrastructure.

That’s what’s made Linux such a lightning rod. If your monitoring tools can monitor servers, SANs, and switches with little to no modification you can concentrate your time on building on those pieces instead of writing and rewriting software to get you back to where you started in the first place. That’s how systems can be extensible and handle changes quickly and efficiently. That’s how you build a platform for other things.


Tom’s Take

I like building Lego sets. But I really like building them with the old fashioned basic bricks. Not the fancy new ones from licensed sets. Because the old bricks were only limited by your creativity. You could move them around and put them anywhere because they were all the same. You could build amazing things with the right basic pieces.

Clouds and stacks aren’t all that dissimilar. We need to focus on building underlays of networking and compute systems with the same kinds of basic blocks if we ever hope to have something that we can build upon for the future. You may not be able to influence the design of systems at the most basic level when it comes to vendors and suppliers, but you can vote with your dollars to back the solutions that give you the flexibility to get your job done. I can promise you that when the revenue from proprietary, non-open underlay technologies goes down the suppliers will start asking you the questions you need to answer for them.

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One thought on “Linux and the Quest for Underlays

  1. Pingback: Worth Reading: Linux Underlays - 'net work

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