A Decade of CCIE Certification

I was notified this week that I’m eligible for the 10-year CCIE plaque. Which means that it’s been a decade since I walked out of Cisco’s Building C in San Jose with a new number and a different outlook on my networking career. The cliche is that “so many things have changed” since that day and it’s absolutely accurate because the only constant in life is change.

Labbing On the Road

I think the first thing that makes me think about the passage of time since my certification is the fact that the lab where I took the exam no longer exists. Building C was sold to the company that owns and operates the San Francisco 49ers stadium just down Tasman drive from the old letter buildings. Those real estate locations were much more valuable to the NFL than to Cisco. I can’t even really go and visit my old stomping grounds any more because the buildings were gutted, renovated, and offered to other operations that aren’t from Cisco.

Now, you don’t even go to San Jose or RTP for the lab. Three years ago the labs in the US moved to Richardson, TX. The central aspect of the location is pretty appealing when you think about it. A part of me wishes I would have had the opportunity to take the lab there since I wouldn’t have to jump on a plane and burn three days of my work schedule. The costs of my lab attempts would have been a lot less if I only had to drive down for one night in a hotel and got to come back and sleep in my bed that same night. I realize that it’s equally inconvenient for people to need to fly to the middle of the country when they used to be closer to the lab when it was on either coast. However, real estate in RTP and San Jose is beyond crazy when it comes to price. Moving the lab to somewhere more reasonable means Cisco is getting value out of their buildings elsewhere.

The mobile lab is another aspect of the changes in the CCIE certification program that are a welcome change. By putting the lab on the road and giving people in countries far away from a lab location the opportunity to get certified the program can continue to be relevant. This is due in large part to the changes in the lab that allow a large part of it to be virtualized or operated remotely from a rack located somewhere else. I remember starting my lab studies and thinking to myself that the rack that I was working on was just across the room. Not that there was much that I could do about it. The idea that there could be something going on that was just out of my reach was an itch I had to get over. Today, you would never even start to believe that you had a hardware issue in your lab because of the streamlining of the process. That can only happen when you optimize your offerings to the point where you can just virtualize the whole thing.

The Next Ten Years

Right now, I still have a year to go on my certification before I have to make the decision to keep it current or go to Emeritus retirement. My role on the CCIE Advisory council doesn’t matter either way. I’m likely going to just go Emeritus when the opportunity presents itself because I don’t use those lab skills every day. I’m not configuring BGP filter lists and port channels like I used to. The technical skills that I honed in Building C serve me more now to understand technology at an architecture level. I can see how people are using tools to solve problems and offer commentary when they are making poor decisions or when a better protocol exists.

The CCIE itself is still a very valuable certification to hold and study for. IT certification on the whole has been trending away from being the gold standard for hiring. Cloud and DevOps focus more on skills instead of papers hanging on a wall. However, operations teams still need ways to differentiate their people. If nothing else the CCIE is a great forcing function for you to figure out how deeply into networking you really want to get. It’s not enough to be curious about BGP or Frame Relay and traffic shaping QoS. You have to understand it at a level that would bore most others to tears. If you’re not prepared to know the minutia of a protocol the way that some people memorize batting averages or random movie trivia than you might not be up for this particular challenge.

The CCIE also isn’t going away any time soon. I remarked to someone the other day that the CCIE is a technology bellweather. I can remember the clamor to introduce the “new” SDN changes into the program so many years ago. I also chuckle when I think about the CCIE OpenFlow that more than a couple of people proposed. The certification program exists to refine and highlight the technology solutions that people are using today. It’s not a sneak peak at things that might be important later on in life. Think about how long it took for them to remove ISDN, ATM, and even frame relay from the test. And even frame relay was debated heavily because more than a few claimed they still used it in production.

The CCIE is a testament to the way that people study for and build networks at a high level. It’s not a cool badge to keep on your list like a hunting trophy. It’s a testament to the commitment that it takes to attain something like that. The JNCIE and the VCDX are much the same. They represent an investment of time and energy into something that proves your capabilities. More than any other certification, the CCIE challenges people. It creates study habits and builds communities. It makes people ask themselves hard questions about desire and commitment and helps the best rise to the occasion. It’s more than just a certification.


Tom’s Take

I wouldn’t change a thing about my CCIE journey. I learned as much from the failures as I did from the success. The opportunities afforded to me because of that number have been immeasurable. But through it all I realized that the process of getting my lab has helped shape me into who I am today. A decade past late night study sessions and soul-crushing failures I know that it was all worth it because it helped me take technology more seriously and form the habits and process that have served me well from then on. I’m happy to get the new plaque that marks me as a veteran of the lab plus ten years. My status as a CCIE might pass into Emeritus but the lessons I learned along the way will always be there.

Charting the Course For Aruba

By now you’ve seen the news that longtime CEO of Aruba Keerti Melkote is retiring. He’s decided that his 20-year journey has come to a conclusion and he is stepping down into an advisory role until the end of the HPE fiscal year on October 31, 2021. Leaving along with him are CTO Partha Narasimhan and Chief Architect Pradeep Iyer. It’s a big shift in the way that things will be done going forward for Aruba. There are already plenty of hot takes out there about how this is going to be good or bad for Aruba and for HPE depending on which source you want to read. Because I just couldn’t resist I’m going to take a stab at it too.

Happy Trails To You

Keerti is a great person. He’s smart and capable and has always surrounded himself with good people as well. The HPE acquisition honestly couldn’t have gone any better for him and his team. The term “reverse acquisition” gets used a lot and I think this is one of the few positive examples of it. Aruba became the networking division of HPE. They rebuilt the husk that was HP’s campus networking division and expanded it substantially. They introduced new data center switches and kept up with their leading place in the access point market.

However, even the best people eventually need new challenges. There was always a bit of a looming role on the horizon for Keerti according to many industry analysts. As speculated by Stephen Foskett on this past week’s episode of the Gestalt IT Rundown, Keerti was the odds-on favorite to take over HPE one day. He had the pedigree of running a successful business and he understood how data moving to the cloud was going to be a huge driver for hardware in the future. He even had taken over a combined business unit of networking devices and edge computing renamed Intelligent Edge last year. All signs pointed to him being the one to step up when Antonio Neri eventually moved on.

That Keerti chose to step away now could indicate that he realized the HPE CEO job was not going to break his way. Perhaps the pandemic has sapped some of his desire to continue to run the business. Given that Partha and Pradeep are also choosing to depart as well it could be more of an indicator of internal discussions and not a choice by Keerti to move on of his own accord. I’m not speculating that there is pressure on him. It could just be that this was the best time to make the exit after steering the ship through the rough seas of the pandemic.

Rearranging the Deck Chairs

That brings me to the next interesting place that Aruba finds itself. With Keerti and company off to greener pastures, who steps in to replace them? When I first heard the news of the departure of three very visible parts of Aruba all at once my first thought jumped immediately to David Hughes, the former CEO of Silver Peak.

HPE bought Silver Peak last year and integrated their SD-WAN solutions into Aruba. I was a bit curious about this when it first happened because Aruba had been touting their SD-Branch solution that leveraged ClearPass extensively. To shift gears and adopt Silver Peak as the primary solution for the WAN edge was a shift in thinking. By itself that might have been a minor footnote.

Then a funnier thing happened that gave me pause. I started seeing more and more Silver Peak names popping up at Aruba. That’s something you would expect to see when a company gets acquired. But the people that were hopping into roles elsewhere outside of the WAN side of the house was somewhat shocking. It felt for a while like Silver Peak was taking over a lot of key positions inside of Aruba on the marketing side of the house. Which meant that the team was poised for something bigger in the long run.

When David Hughes was named as the successor to Partha and Pradeep as the CTO and Chief Architect at Aruba it made sense to me. Hughes is good at the technology. He understand the WAN and networking. He doesn’t need to worry about much about the wireless side of the house because Aruba has tons of wireless experts, including Chuck Lukaszewski. Hughes will do a great job integrating the networking and WAN side of the house to embrace the edge mentality that Aruba and HPE have been talking about for the past several months.

So, if David Hughes isn’t running Aruba, who is? That would be Phil Mottram, a veteran of the HPE Communications Technology Group. He has management material written all over him. He’s been an executive at a number of companies and he is going to steer Aruba in the direction that HPE wants it to go. That’s where the real questions are going to start being asked around here. I’m sure there’s probably going to be some kind of a speech by Antonio Neri about how Aruba is a proud part of the HPE family and the culture that has existed at Aruba is going to continue even after the departure of the founder. That’s pretty much the standard discussion you have with everyone after they leave. I’m sure something very similar happened after the Meraki founders left Cisco post-acquisition.

The Sky’s The Limit

What is HPE planning for Aruba? If I were a betting man, I’d say the current trend is going to see Aruba become more integrated into HPE. Not quite on the level of Nimble Storage but nowhere near the practical independence they’ve had for the last few years. We’re seeing that HPE is looking at Aruba as a valuable brand as much as anything else. The moves above in relation to the departure of Keerti make that apparent.

Why would you put a seasoned CEO in the role of Chief Architect? Why would you name a senior Vice President to the role of President of that business unit? And why would the CEO agree to be where he is willingly when that carrot is just out of reach? I would say it’s because David Hughes either realizes or has been told that the role of Chief Architect is going to be much more important in the coming months. That would make a lot of sense if the identity of Aruba begins to be subsumed into HPE proper.

Think about Meraki and Cisco. Meraki has always been a fiercely independent company. You would have been hard pressed for the first year or two to even realize that Cisco was the owner. However, in the past couple of years the walls that separate Cisco and Meraki have started to come down. Meraki is functioning more like a brand inside of Cisco than an independent part of the organization. It’s not a negative thing. In fact, it’s what should happen to successful companies when they get purchased. However, given the independence streak of the past it seems more intriguing than what’s on the surface.

Aruba is going to find itself being pulled in more toward HPE’s orbit. The inclusion of Aruba in the HPE Intelligent Edge business unit says that HPE has big plans for the whole thing. They don’t want to have their customers seeing HPE and Aruba as two separate things. Instead, HPE would love to leverage the customers that Aruba does have today to bring in more HPE opportunities. The synergy between the two is the whole reason for the acquisition in the first place. Why not take advantage of it? Perhaps the departure of the old guard is the impetus for making that change?


Tom’s Take

Aruba isn’t going to go away. It’s not going to be like a storage solution being eaten alive and then disappearing into a nameplate on a rack unit. Aruba has too much value as a brand and a comfortable position in the networking space to be completely eliminated. However, it is going to become more valuable to have the expertise of the Aruba teams creating more synergy inside of HPE and leading efforts to integrate the edge networking and compute solutions together to come out ahead as people shift some of their workloads around to take advantage of all the work that’s been done there. Time will tell if Aruba stays separate enough to be remembered as the titan they’ve been.

Document The First Time, Every Time

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Imagine you’re deep into a massive issue. You’ve been troubleshooting for hours trying to figure out why something isn’t working. You’ve pulled in resources to help and you’re on the line with the TAC to try and get a resolution. You know this has to be related to something recent because you just got notified about it yesterday. You’re working through logs and configuration setting trying to gain insights into what went wrong. That’s when the TAC engineer hits you with with an armor-piecing question:

When did this start happening?

Now you’re sunk. When did you first start seeing it? Was it happening before and no one noticed? Did a tree fall in the forest and no one was around to hear the sound? What is the meaning of life now?

It’s not too hard to imagine the above scenario because we’ve found ourselves in it more times than we can count. We’ve started working on a problem and traced it back to a root cause only to find out that the actual inciting incident goes back even further than that. Maybe the symptoms just took a while to show up. Perhaps someone unknowingly “fixed” the issue with a reboot or a process reload over and over again until it couldn’t work any longer. How do we find ourselves in this mess? And how do we keep it from happening?

Quirky Worky

Glitches happen. Weird bugs crop up temporarily. It happens every day. I had to reboot my laptop the other day after being up for about two months because of a series of weird errors that I couldn’t resolve. Little things that weren’t super important that eventually snowballed into every service shutting down and forcing me to restart. But what was the cause? I can’t say for sure and I can’t tell you when it started. Because I just ignored the little glitches until the major ones forced me to do something.

Unless you work in security you probably ignore little strange things that happen. Maybe an application takes twice as long to load one morning. Perhaps you click on a link and it pops up a weird page before going through to the actual website. You could even see a storage notification in the logs for a router that randomly rebooted itself for no reason in the middle of the night. Occasional weirdness gets dismissed by us because we’ve come to expect that things are just going to act strangely. I once saw a quote from a developer that said, “If you think building a steady-state machine is easy, just look at how many issues are solved with a reboot.”

We tend to ignore weirdness unless it presents itself as a more frequent issue. If a router reboots itself once we don’t think much about it. The fourth time it reboots itself in a day we know we’ve got a problem we need to fix. Could we have solved it when the first reboot happened? Maybe. But we also didn’t know we were looking at a pattern of behavior either. Human brains are wired to look for patterns of things and pick them out. It’s likely an old survival trait of years gone by that we apply to current technology.

Notice that I said “unless you work in security”. That’s because the security folks have learned over many years and countless incidents that nothing is truly random or strange. They look for odd remote access requests or strange configuration changes on devices. They wonder why random IP addresses from outside the company are trying to access protected systems. Security professionals treat every random thing as a potential problem. However, that kind of behavior also demonstrates the downside of analyzing every little piece of information for potential threats. You quickly become paranoid about everything and spend a lot of time and energy trying to make sense out of potential nonsense. Is it any wonder that many security pros find themselves jumping at every little shadow in case it’s hiding a beast?

Middle Ground of Mentions

On the one hand, we have systems people that dismiss weirdness until it’s a pattern. On the other we have security pros that are trying to make patterns out of the noise. I’m sure you’re probably wondering if there has to be some kind of middle ground to ensure we’re keeping track of issues without driving ourselves insane.

In fact, there is a good policy that you need to get into the habit of doing. You need to write it all down somewhere. Yes, I’m talking about the dreaded documentation monster. The kind of thing that no one outside of developers likes to do. The mean, nasty, boring process of taking the stuff in your brain and putting it down somewhere so someone can figure out what you’re thinking without the need to read your mind.

You have to write it down because you need to have a record to work from if something goes wrong later. One of the greatest features I’ve ever worked with that seems to be ignored by just about everyone is the Windows Shutdown Reason dialog box in Windows Server 2003 and above. Rebooting a box? You need to write in why and give a good justification. That way if someone wants to know why the server was shut off at 11:15am on a Tuesday they can examine the logs. Unfortunately in my experience the usual reason for these shutdowns was either “a;lkjsdfl;kajsdf” or “because I am doing it”. Which aren’t great justifications for later.

You don’t have to be overly specific with your documentation but you need to give enough detail so that later you can figure out if this is part of a larger issue. Did an application stop responding and need to be restarted? Jot that down. Did you need to kill a process to get another thing running again? Write down that exact sentence. If you needed to restart a router and you ended up needing to restore a configuration you need to jot that part down too. Because you may not even realize you have an issue until you have documentation to point it out.

I can remember doing a support call years ago with a customer and in conversation he asked me if I knew much about Cisco routers. I chuckled and said I knew a bit. He said that he had one that he kept having to copy the configuration files to every time it restarted because it came up blank. He even kept a console cable plugged into it for just that reason. Any CCNA out there knows that’s probably a config register issue so I asked when it started happening. The person told me at least a year ago. I asked if anyone had to get into the router because of a forgotten password or some other lockout. He said that he did have someone come out a year and a half prior to reset a messed up password. Ever since then he had to keep putting the configuration back in. Sure enough, the previous tech hadn’t reset the config register. One quick fix and the customer was very happy to not have to worry about power outages any longer.

Documenting when things happen means you can build a timeline per device or per service to understand when things are acting up. You don’t even need to figure it out yourself. The magic of modern systems lies in machine learning. You may think to yourself that machine learning is just fancy linear regression at this point and you would be right more often than not. But one thing linear regression is great at doing is surfacing patterns of behavior for specific data points. If your router reboots on the third Wednesday of every month precisely at 3:33am the ML algorithms will pick up on that and tell you about it. But that’s only if your system catches the reboot through logs or some other record keeping. That’s why you have to document all your weirdness. Because the ML systems can analyze what they don’t know about.


Tom’s Take

I love writing. And I hate documentation. Documentation is boring, stuffy, and super direct. It’s like writing book reports over and over again. I’d rather write a fun blog post or imagine an exciting short story. However, documentation of issues is critical to modern organizations because these issues can spiral out of hand before you know it. If you don’t write it down it didn’t happen. And you need to know when it happened if you hope to prevent it in the future.

When Hardware Drives Software Upgrades

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What’s your favorite version of Microsoft Windows? Is it Windows 10? Maybe it’s Windows XP? Windows 95? Odds are good that you have one version you appreciated more than most. Windows XP, Windows 7, and Windows 10 tend to rank high on the list. Windows ME and Windows 8 seem to rank pretty low. Yet, for all their impressive love and all the users clinging to them we don’t really use anything other than Windows 10 any more.

You might be tempted to say that the OS isn’t supported any longer so there’s no reason to run it. Yet we still drive vehicles that are no longer under warranty. We still buy classic cars that are older than we are and put parts in them to keep them running. Why is software different? What drives us to keep needing to upgrade our programs?

You might be shocked to learn that the most popular reason to upgrade software is, in fact, driven by hardware. It’s not the memory requirements or the fancy new user interface that drives people to move to the new platform. More often than not it’s because a new piece of hardware has requirements that only work on the latest version of the system.

It happened to me once or twice. I can distinctly remember needing to go out and buy a new printer to replace some cheap HP Inkjet I purchased for a project because when I upgraded from Windows XP to Windows 7 the drivers didn’t support the move. Why spend money writing new drivers for a cheap printer when you could just make people go out and buy another new cheap printer? I swear that’s what happened. And, of course, the most expensive the device you purchase the more likely it stays supported, right?

The Lords of COBOL

By now I’m sure you’re all familiar with the little tidbit of information that most of the world’s insurance companies run their databases on ancient mainframes. Why? Well, most of their software still requires COBOL to run. Large organizations don’t like to move to new platforms very often. It wasn’t that long ago that Southwest Airlines moved to a new booking system because the old one only had two days you could schedule flights – Monday through Friday and Sunday. If you scheduled a flight for Monday through Friday you had to have the same flight at the same time every day no matter what. It’s even widely believed that part of the reason that United Airlines merged with Continental was because they wanted to switch to a better booking system.

Why do companies keep these systems around? It should be easy to just migrate off of them, right? Well, reality is that between the sunk cost of operating a mainframe for years and patching the software that you’ve built to operate your business the desire to move to something else isn’t always a driver. After all, if it ain’t broke why fix it? Companies can keep maintaining old systems as long as someone sticks around to keep the lights on. I can remember working with a number of IT professionals over the years that had their jobs mostly because they were the final remaining mainframe wizard that knew how to put the system into maintenance mode or remembered the magical incantations to reboot the old machine after a power failure.

Alas, nothing lasts forever. The current pattern seems to be pretty standard. The old wizards finally decide to retire. They’ve had enough and they’re ready to move to somewhere warm and enjoy not working. The management keeps the lights going because it’s not that hard, right? It would take way too much to rewrite the software or move people to a new platform. Until the day when the system stops working. The day when everything doesn’t come back up. Then it’s panic mode. Was that just the database? What if it’s the actual hardware. Do they still make parts for this? Does anyone even know what this button does? Eventually either the hard decision is made to cut over somehow or an exorbitant amount of money is paid to the former operations people to come back and get things running again long enough to figure out how to keep this from happening again. And if you think you’re going to be able to train a developer to just pick up where the grizzled old wizard left off, good luck. Go find a COBOL training course somewhere. I’ll wait.

Modern Makers Make Mistakes Too

If you think that the modern era of cloud development is any different than writing FORTRAN or COBOL on a mainframe you’ve got a nice set of rose-colored glasses. We’re locking ourselves into the same patterns of thought that brought on the monoliths we’re currently trying to tear down. Every time you enable a feature that only works on one cloud platform or you choose to develop in a hot new language that isn’t fully supported everywhere you’re putting up a barrier that will eventually lead to you making hard choices.

You know what’s different this time, though? You don’t have the luxury of a position where you get to be the wizard that knows how to keep the lights on. As the article above mentions, the race is on to get the COBOL migrated to a modern platform that allows integration with languages like C# and Java. Do you believe that having platforms like that means you’ll get to a point where you can be the last remaining person around that remembers what crazy setup you used to minimize the number of containers an app was using? Or do you think it’s more likely they’ll just fire you, figure out how to integrate your legacy code into a new platform, and go on painting themselves right back into corners?

Hardware is the last true driver to keep people moving along into a place where they are forced to do things the right way. If your hardware doesn’t support something you don’t do it. If you need to ensure that your code is portable you don’t bake in features that require specific hardware or you create a situation where you’re tied to that platform forever. That’s why cloud is a bit scary in my mind. Because you’re agnostic from the hardware. You can do whatever you want without limit.

Want to write software that requires the use of hundreds of processing threads? You can do it because why not? You aren’t limited to just one chip any longer. Want to eat up tons of memory and storage? Go for it. You get to use as much as your credit card can hold. Now the bounds of a programmer’s imagination is no longer limited to physical hardware limitations. If you don’t believe me then ask yourself why there are apps on the App Store today that are bigger then the entire amount of storage that the original iPhone was capable of. Sure, hardware brought us to this point. But ditching the hardware for the magic of the cloud means there isn’t anything holding back those that want to build the biggest, burliest, baddest application they can!


Tom’s Take

Somewhat ironically, I’m not really that worried about the cloud letting people build ugly things to their hearts’ content. Why? Just like terrible movie directors, once you’ve removed their limitations you expose their vulnerabilities and they build something that is unsustainable. Build the biggest app you can. You’ll find out that it collapses under its own weight. Even the promise of the mythical giant virtual machines with 1 TB of RAM haven’t made them materialize. Why? Because it turns out that removing restrictions just enforces them through trial and error. If you have to build small because you can’t get crazy due to hardware you’re held back by external forces. But when you are held back because you tried it that way the last time and you failed by creating an app that takes ten minutes to load you learned your lesson. You get leaner and better and more portable next time. And that’s the kind of driver that makes software and hardware better for us all.

Networking Isn’t Just A Tool

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It’s another event week for me at Networking Field Day 25 and I’m continually impressed with the level of technology that we see in the networking world. I think back to how things looked when I was still deploying the networks I built and it seems like a hundred years ago instead of a decade. More software driving better outcomes for users. Easier collection of analytics and telemetry to understand how to tune things and make them faster and better. And, honestly, more need for advanced technical people to tune everything and make it work better.

When you consider that the last year has been done over the Internet for most of us it gets even crazier. Meetings, software productivity, and even food delivery has been driven by apps running in the cloud that we communicate with over the Internet. I can remember a time when I didn’t have a mobile phone in my pocket with Internet capabilities. Today I can barely imagine not having it at my fingertips. When the network is not doing things the way we want we quickly find out how dependent we’ve become on our connectivity.

Generational Differences

My children are amazed that dial-up networking used to be a thing. I remember rebuilding Winsock stacks in Windows 98 for Gateway in order to troubleshoot 56k modems not connecting to AOL at the beginning of the millennium. Today my cable modem gets me where I need to go when I’m home and my 5G phone does the heavy lifting for me when I’m on the road. Need to look up a price on something? Or know the temperature? Or just listen to a song you remember from your childhood? It’s all at your fingertips. I can’t imagine that kind of connectivity back when it took a minute or two for the phone to scream out the song of Compuserve at my house.

My in-laws have a DSL connection that suits them just fine for their needs. It’s painfully slow for me. I couldn’t live with their slow connection and inability to run multiple things at once, like video streaming and Zoom meetings at the same time. They don’t live very far from me either. The difference in their connectivity is shocking. And yet, we just expect to be able to get online any time we want.

Remember ATTWIFI at Starbucks? Remember when your iPhone would automatically connect to give you better speeds when your 3G was overwhelmed? I can recall getting into a situation where Cisco Live in Las Vegas made my phone unusable outside of the conference. Today that situation would be unacceptable. And we’re barely a decade removed from those days.

As I keep seeing technology moving along even faster, including things like silicon photonics promising speeds north of hundreds of gigabits on the uplink side, I wonder how our next generation is going to feel about not being able to watch 8k TV shows in a self-driving car on-demand because there’s not enough bandwidth. I laugh when I remember the need to swap out DVDs on car trips so my eldest son could have entertainment. Today my youngest is happy to binge watch shows on Disney without interruption because of the networks we’ve built.

Creating Dependence

What we’ve built has created the world we live in. But we also have made it a world dependent on what we’ve built. I realized that months ago when my network connection kept going out during a winter storm. Without connectivity people feel lost. I had a hard time getting things done offline without being able to look up information or get emails sent out. My kids are beside themselves without access to anything online. Their board games were boring. They couldn’t play video games offline because all the cool features were on the Internet. By the time the connection came back it was almost Lord of the Flies around here as the minutes ticked on.

We no longer have the luxury of shrugging our shoulders when the network goes down. It needs to be treated no differently than the electricity or water in a building. If we neglect it we risk alienating our users and stakeholders. We need to be firm when we need new equipment or better designs to ensure resilience. Instead of making everything cheap and barely usable we need to remind everyone how reliant they’ve become on the network. If it’s necessary it is absolutely worth investing in. Moving to the cloud or becoming more and more reliant on SaaS applications just reinforces those decisions.


Tom’s Take

Either the network is just a tool that doesn’t need investment or it’s a necessary part of your work that needs to be treated as such. While I would never suggest unplugging anything to prove a point I think you can point to specific outages that would do the same thing without the chaos. Every time you tell your stakeholders they need to invest in better switches or new access points and they push back about costs or try to suggest a cheaper alternative, you need to stand firm. In a world where everyone is dependent on Internet connectivity for all manner of their lives you have to treat it as a necessity in every possible way. You can tell your stakeholders to spend their day working from their phone hotspot if they don’t believe you. It’ll be like taking a trip back to the early parts of the millennium when networks weren’t as important.

Knowledge is Powerful and Needs to Be Shared

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A tweet this morning from my friend Stephanie stood out in my timeline because she’s talking about something I’ve seen happen over and over again in my lifetime:

How many times have we seen this in our organizations? People want to hoard knowledge because they feel like it’s power. Maybe they’re worried that if anyone knew what they know it would mean they could get fired. Perhaps they enjoy holding the keys to the kingdom and not allowing anyone else to do something or know something they know. It could even be that they like the idea of mystery in the air and not allowing people to know the whole truth keeps things alive, as the founders of Coca-Cola and Colonel Sanders will happily tell you.

Over the years I’ve figured out that hoarding knowledge leads to ruin. I’ve been involved in so many scenarios were a lack of knowledge sharing ended up causing the kinds of problems that were easily avoidable if someone had just committed what they knew to memory. It wasn’t always malicious either. There is a lot of information that people collect incidentally and just flat out forget to write down until it’s too late.

The first time I truly realized how important good documentation was happened on a sad day in my career. My mentor, Wes Williams, tragically passed away during an otherwise uneventful workday during lunch. I wasn’t there but our office got the news shortly thereafter and we were stunned. No one in the office was even thinking about anything other than how tragic it was and how we were going to miss him. Eventually, one of the other engineers stood up and asked, “Does anyone know the password to Wes’s laptop?” We realized that Wes had a ton of knowledge about his clients and other operational things saved on his laptop, which was sitting unlocked on his desk. We rushed to keep it from going to sleep and to make sure that we changed the password to something we all knew. After that, the tedious process of copying all his data to a shared location began. Wes didn’t think to save it all somewhere else because he didn’t know he would need to until it was too late.

Information Is Currency

Since then I’ve tried very hard to share the knowledge that I have so that everyone benefits. The cynics in the organization may see information as a kind of currency to trade power. If you have to come to them to get the answers then they are important in the grand scheme of things. Kind of like a power broker of sorts.

My outlook is different. Having the knowledge written down somewhere means someone can learn what they need and do the job without needing to get me involved. Maybe they have other questions or need further explanation. That’s a great time to engage me. But I don’t need to be a gatekeeper for the basics or feel like I have to hoard it all to myself.

If you think that hoarding knowledge makes you impervious to firing or reassignment, you need to be careful with your hubris. No one is immune from reductions. External factors can limit your involvement with your career or organization before you know it. We use the idea of the “hit by a bus” test to explain how knowledge needs to be shared in the event of a sudden thing like the issue I mentioned above. But what if the situation develops slowly and you get caught up before realizing it’s too late to share what you know?

Power Corrupts

If you’re the person in the company that always calls the ISP to report outages because you know exactly how to navigate the automated trouble ticket system you have value. However, if you never write that down for your team members you’re going to limit your mobility out of your job. No matter how high you climb it will always be your responsibility. Worse yet, if you find yourself in a place where you can’t communicate what you know and someone else has to figure it out on their own your so-called “power” is useless now.

Information is a strange form of power because it loses all it’s inherent value as soon as it’s shared. If I know who the next supervisor is going to be before anyone else then I only have power as long as no one else knows. As soon as someone finds out I no longer control that information and therefore it’s useless. Instead of hoarding knowledge and information to wield as a cudgel to lord over others you should share it freely to ensure it’s not lost. How many advances in human history have been lost because no one wrote them down?

Knowing how something works isn’t a tool you should use to extract further value at the expense of capability. Even if the knowledge is something that shouldn’t be shared for reasons related to secrecy you still need to let people know there is a purpose and they either don’t need to know right now or it’s something that will be available to others. There are many times when I’ve been told that a decision-making process exists and I don’t need to understand it right now. I’m fine with that just so long as it’s written down somewhere. If it’s not then we may all find ourselves recreating a process that was a solved issue simply because someone took the secrets of how it worked with them when they moved on to a different role or out of the organization entirely.


Tom’s Take

There are times when I have to keep things secret. I know something and it’s not time to reveal it. But processes or knowledge about basic things should never fall into that category. It’s one thing to know that your supervisor is being promoted to section leader next week. It’s entirely different to hoard the knowledge of how the factory wireless network is configured because you are afraid if you don’t you’ll get fired. Commit every piece of knowledge you can to paper, physical or virtual, while you can. You never know when someone will need to know what you know. Knowledge is only valuable as currency when it’s shared. And that’s the kind of power that makes you valuable to us all.

Fast Friday Thoughts from the Woods

I’m at camp this week helping put on the second weekend of the Last Frontier Council Wood Badge course which is my idea of a vacation. I’m learning a lot, teaching a lot more, and having fun. But that does’t mean I’m not working too. Lots of fun conversations that make me recall the way people consume information, communicate what they know, and all too often overlook the important things they take for granted.

  • Why is IT one of the few disciplines that expects people to come in fully trained and do the job instead of learning while doing it? Is that because hiring managers don’t want to train people? Or is it because senior people are less likely to impart knowledge to protect their jobs? I don’t have a good answer but I know what the result looks like and it’s not something that’s positive, either for the people doing the job or how it’s perceived outside of IT.
  • There is a ton of value in doing something for real instead of just planning it and calling it good. DR plans need to be tested. Network changes need to be mocked up. No matter what kind of critical thing you’ll be doing you need to try it for real instead of just putting it on paper and hoping that it works. In theory, there’s no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.
  • Don’t forget to commit your knowledge to paper at some point in your career. You may know everything under the sun but when you’re not available you will be missed. You know more than you realize and you need to make sure that others benefit from what you’re capable of helping with. Those that hold the knowledge only have the power when they share it. Keeping it to yourself only hurts those that can benefit. Use your currency effectively.

Tom’s Take

These questions don’t have answers. They are designed to make you think about how you do things and what you can do to leave a legacy for the people that come behind you. Don’t be the story that everyone tells about that guy they hated. Be the inspiration for those that want to be like you in the future.

Racing On the Edge of Burnout

Exhibit A:

It’s been a year and more and I think a lot of us are on the ragged edge of burning out completely. Those that think they are superhuman and can just keep grinding away at things without acknowledging what’s going on are kidding themselves. I know I’m feeling it too even though I have a pretty decent handle on what’s going on. Let’s explore some of the ways it’s impacting us and what should be done, if anything can even be done.

Creativity Black Hole

I don’t feel like doing anything remotely creative right now. The cooking will get finished. The dishes will be done. The things in my floor will be picked up and put away. But beyond that? Good. Luck. I’m not feeling any kind of drive to do anything beyond that.

Remember when everyone was picking up quarantine skills? Baking, cooking, knitting, crocheting, home improvement, or even an instrument? Those were fun days filled with massive uncertainty and a need to distract ourselves from what might be coming next. However, those skill pickups are things that need time to work on and refine and continue to master. And now that the world is back in full swing we don’t have any more time than we did before. In fact, we have a lot less.

Now we face a choice of doing what we’ve always done before, albeit in a more restricted fashion, but now with the added pressure of an additional time sink staring us in the face. You can’t improve your cooking skills if you don’t cook. But when you don’t have a mountain of free time to devote to researching recipes or putting together the best shopping list or exploring new places to source ingredients you’re going to feel like it’s back to being a chore and end up churning out chicken nuggets and macaroni and cheese.

That’s what burnout looks like. When something you previously enjoyed becomes a chore like any other because you have no time to devote to it and get enjoyment from it. Whether you want to admit it or not all your creative pursuits feel like this right now. I know I find myself zoning out more often than not when it comes to free time. I don’t want to write or cook or learn to play the harmonica. I just want to spend a few moments not thinking about anything. And that’s what it feels like to be burned out.

How about doing things even remotely adjacent to work? Writing a coverage post from a presentation or recording a new podcast episode or a video? If it feels like actual work you’re probably going to avoid it just as much as you avoid the things you actually like to do. That means the rest of your creative output is going to suffer too.

Escape Velocity

Now that we know we’re burned out and don’t want to admit it, how do we fix it? The short answer is that we can’t. We’re still in the uncertain period of balancing work and creativity and other stuff going on. Our current battle is watching those two things fighting for supremacy. Work commands our attention to get the stuff done that pays the bills. Creative pursuits are clamoring for air because remember that cool time last year when we made all the sourdough bread? How do we make them both work?

Another quote that has been resounding with me recently is “If you prioritize your distractions over your responsibilities then your distractions are your responsibilities.”

We want to get away from the stuff that grinds on us. But when the things we use to get away become a grind then they just fall into the same place. We need to keep those distractions separate and use them when we need to as opposed to just taking a 30-minute break twice a day and working on our harmonica scales. When you associate your distraction with your responsibilities you stop liking it as much.

I use Scouting as one of my distractions. It’s basically my hobby at this point when you consider how much time I’ve invested into it. Yet, I find myself starting to get burned out on it as well. Part of that is my inability to say “no” to doing things. And that lack of time is wearing thin because I can’t be everywhere at once. I need to pull back from all the things that I’m doing because otherwise my hobby will become just another job that gets in the way of me relaxing and letting go.

Understanding each and every part of these battles is key to drawing the lines around what you need to keep burnout at bay. Our brains like to consume all the things around a hobby or topic and then walk away from it when it doesn’t produce the same kind of dopamine response. We have to teach our brains to enjoy a bit of what we like and not eat it all at once and get tired of it. That’s why scheduling time for things is so important. Otherwise you’ll grind yourself away to nothing. Make time for your responsibilities and your distractions and don’t mingle the two or you’re going to end up with some kind of unappetizing oatmeal of things.


Tom’s Take

I’m burned out. And I don’t want to admit it. Things keep slipping out of my head and I can’t seem to keep up like I want. Acknowledging it is the first step. Now that I know I’m burned out I can try and fix it by making those changes. Don’t soldier on and hope that you’re going to pull through it. Admit that you’re more burned out than you realize. You may not be completely gone yet but if you ignore it you soon will be. Instead, take the time to prioritize what you need to take care of and what you want to do to enjoy life. Schedule a hike. Make time to practice your instrument. But make sure you keep it segregated and keep your work life where it belongs. Don’t bake bread at 9am on a Monday and don’t send emails at 9pm on a Friday. And be kind to yourself. Your brain doesn’t like burnout any more than you do. Take a moment, take a breath, and take some time for you.

Real Life Ensues

Hey everyone! You probably noticed that I didn’t post a blog last week. Which means for the first time in over ten years I didn’t post one. The streak is done. Why? Well, real life decided to take over for a bit. I was up to my eyeballs in helping put on our BSA council Wood Badge course. I had a great time and completely lost track of time while I was there. And that means I didn’t get a chance to post something. Which is a perfect excuse to discuss why I set goals the way that I do.

Consistency Is Key

I write a lot. Between my blog here and the writing I do for Gestalt IT I do at least 2-3 posts a week. That’s on top of any briefing notes I type out or tweets I send when I have the energy to try and be funny. For someone that felt they weren’t a prolific writer in the past I can honestly say I spend a lot of time writing out things now. Which means that I have to try and keep a consistent schedule of doing things or else I will get swamped by some other projects.

I set the goal of one post a week because it’s an easy checkpoint for me. If it’s Friday and I haven’t posted anything here I know I need to do something. That’s why a large number of my posts come out on Friday. I keep a running checkpoint in my head to figure out what I want to cover and whether or not I’ve done it. When I can mark it down that I’ve done it then I can rest easy until next week.

With my Gestalt IT writing, I tend to go in batches. I try to find a couple of ideas that work for me and I plow through the posts. If I can get 3-4 done at a time it’s easy to schedule them out. For whatever reason it’s much easier to batch them on that side of the house than it is for me to work ahead on my personal blog.

If I don’t stay consistent I worry that the time I dedicate to blogging is going to be replaced by other things. It’s the same reason I feel like I need to stay on top of exercising or scheduling other meetings. Once the time that I spend taking care of something gets replaced by something else I feel like I never get that time back.

I know that doing things like that doesn’t work the way we would like it to work. Juggling writing without a firm schedule only leads to problems down the road. However, I feel like treating my blog posts like a single juggling ball being tossed up in the air over and over keeps my focus sharp. Unless something major comes along that absolutely steals my focus away I can make it work. I even thought to myself last Thursday that I needed to write something up. Alas, lack of sleep and other distractions get in the way before I could make it happen.

Writing Down the Routine

It’s important that you pencil in your routine to make it stick. Sure, after ten years I know that I need to write something each week. It’s finally ingrained in my head. But with other things, like exercise or harmonica practice or even just remembering to take out the garbage on Thursdays I need to have some way of reminding me or blocking time.

Using a reminders app or a journaling system is a great way to make that happen in your own head. Something you can refer to regularly to make sure that things are getting done. Whatever it is works just fine as long as you’re checking it and updating it regularly. Once you let that slip you’ll find yourself cursing it all because you’re halfway through a month with no updates.

Likewise, you need to make sure to block time on you calendar to take care of important things. My morning routine involves blocking time to go for a walk or a run. I also block time to write down posts and projects that are due. Putting those times on my calendar mean that I not only get notified when it’s time to start working on things but that other people can also see what I’m up to and schedule accordingly. Just be careful that you leave time to do other stuff. Also, while it’s important to use that term wisely don’t just sit there and do nothing if you’ve scheduled writing time. Write something down with the time you have. Even if it’s just a random idea or three. You never know when those half baked ideas can be leveraged to make full-blown magic!


Tom’s Take

I had every intention of writing my makeup post on Monday. Which slipped to Tuesday or Wednesday. And then I realized that real life is never going to stop. You have to make time for the important things. If that means writing something at midnight to post the next day or jogging up and down a muddy dirt road at ten minutes before midnight to ensure you close your last activity rings you have to do what needs to be done. Time isn’t going to magically appear. The gaps in your schedule will fill up. You need to be the one to decide how you’re going to use it. Let your priorities ensue in real life instead of the other way around.

Tom’s Corner and Turning Another Corner

Thanks to everyone that popped in for Tom’s Virtual Corner at Cisco Live Global 2021. It was a great time filled with chats about nothing in particular, crazy stories about unimportant things, and even the occasional funny picture. It was just was Tom’s Corner has always been. A way for the community to come together and be around each other in a relaxing and low-key environment. Maybe we couldn’t meet in person but we got together when we needed it the most.

There was also something else that Tom’s Corner has represented for me for the last year that I didn’t even catch until it was pointed out to me by my wonderful wife Kristin (@MrsNetwrkingNerd). Tom’s Corner was the start of something that made me feel better about everything.

Get On Up and Move

After Tom’s Virtual Corner in 2020, I was energized. I needed to get up and get things done after sitting in a chair for hours talking to all my absent friends and getting the energy I needed to feel after months of being locked away during a pandemic. I felt on top of the world for the first time in quite a while. And I needed to do something with that burst of energy.

So I got up and went for a walk. Exciting, right? I recorded a quick Periscope (RIP) video thanking everyone in the community for turning out and being a part of things even behind the keyboard. Then I kept going. Walking a mile or two and then coming back home. I noticed that after I did I closed my Apple Watch fitness rings for calories burned and exercise.

Rather than just counting steps like a Fitbit, Apple came up with their own measure of activity. I had a love/hate relationship with it. Some days it was easy to get my goal for standing once a minute every hour. Other days was impossible thanks to airplanes and such. Calories could be a breeze on days at events due to all the walking. Or they could be a disaster on days when I barely got out of my chair. Exercise goals were almost impossible. How could I find time to hit those?

After the amazing energy of Tom’s Virtual Corner in 2020, I decided to get serious about fitness. No more excuses. No more giving up and calling it a day because it was too hot outside or raining. I was going to do this because I needed to do it and the people that I care for in the community gave their time to be a part of something special to me. If they could do that I could find the time to do it too.

June 1 became June 30th and I was still going strong. I kept moving. My walking turned into getting back into running with a Couch to 5k beginner program I’ve done several times before. This time I was determined not to give up so easily. I thought back to the year before when I was able to run for a bit but ended up mixing up the walking and running and ultimately going back to being all but sedentary. The key for me this time was moving every day. Not just getting out every other day but walking one day and running the next.

The Running Nerd

Before I knew it, I was running more than I was walking. I was going further with every exercise. I felt better. I also noticed that I was losing weight, which was something that hadn’t happened the last time I was exercising. My health was improving. My belt had to tighten an extra notch. By the time of Mobility Field Day 5 at the end of July someone pointed out that I looked slimmer. I didn’t really notice it that much.

As the months went on more and more people remarked that I looked slimmer and fitter. It took four months before I stepped on a scale to be sure. And yes, I really was losing weight. Not a few pounds but a lot of them. As best as I can guess I was somewhere just over 265 pounds in this picture from February 2020:

Looking back at it now I can’t even believe it. I didn’t change my diet. All that happened was that we started cooking more and more meals at home thanks to the pandemic. I got better at making things I wanted to eat and knowing what was going into them. My every-other-day runs became more frequent. I was only walking twice a week now and running the other five days. My runs went from just barely 3 miles on occasion to at least 5 miles a day. My walks were up to 6 miles a day too.

Here’s a side by side comparison of what I looked like in June of 2020 and what I look like right now (March 2021):

I’m down three pants sizes. I weigh 210 pounds, down 55 lbs from my highest weight just over a year ago. My running is getting faster. I feel better. My doctor has told me everything looks much better than it did when he saw me last year for my checkup. When I got my BSA medical form filled out for my activities right before the pandemic last year I was worried I was going to be in trouble because I was too heavy for my height. When I had it done again last month I was well under the weight limit for the first time in a very long time.

Tom’s Corner is what set me on this path. The positive energy of the community kicked me forward and helped me see that I needed to be healthy. I needed to get back to a place where I didn’t feel self-conscious and worried about weight gain or my fitness to go on hikes or be active. The response of people when they see how much weight I’ve lost or how much I run has boosted my confidence even more and encouraged me to keep going.

I’ve closed my rings for 303 straight days. The light at the end of the year-long tunnel is almost here. I’m going to make it there even if I have to walk at 11:00pm at night to get those last few calories or do an Apple workout in the middle of a blizzard to make sure I didn’t miss my exercise goal. It’s something that drives me to wake up and make plans for the day. When I didn’t get my run in during Tom’s Corner this year I made sure to get it done as soon as I could so I didn’t miss out. I need to stay healthy and happy to ensure there are more Tom’s Corner meetups in the future.


Tom’s Corner

Motivation is hard. I’ve learned that lesson my whole life both the easy way and the hard way. Like a shark, if I stop moving I’m not going to start again. Planning how I’m going to make this all happen takes cycles of my day but results in a happier, healthier, more confident me. Thanks to my friends and fellow community members at Tom’s Corner I’ve transformed myself into something to be proud of. I’m often told that Tom’s Corner gives people something they need. Maybe it’s a place in the community. Or a friendly conversation when they need it the most. For me, Tom’s Corner was the kick in the pants I needed to be a better Tom. Thank you all for helping me turn that corner and get better.