It’s About Time and Project Management

I stumbled across a Reddit thread today from /u/Magician_Hiker that posed a question I’ve always found fascinating. When we work on projects, it always seems like there is a disconnect between the project management team and the engineering team doing the work. The statement posted at the top of this thread is as follows:

Project Managers only plan for when things go right.

Engineers always plan for when things go wrong.

How did we get here? And can anything be done about it?

Projecting Management

I’ve had a turn or two at project management. I got my Project+ many years back, and even more years before that I had to learn all about project management in college. The science behind project management is storied and deep. The idea of having someone assigned to keep things running on task and making sure all the little details get taken care of is a huge boon as the size of projects grow.

As an engineer, can you imagine trying to juggle three different installations across 5 different sites that all need to be coordinated together? Can you think about the effort needed to make sure that everything works together and is done on time? The thought alone probably gives you hives.

Project managers are capable of juggling lots of things in their professional capabilities. That means keeping all the dishes cooking at the same time and making sure that everything is done on time to eat dinner. It also means that people need to know about timelines and how those timelines intersect and can impact the execution of multiple phases of a project. Sure, it’s easy to figure out that we can’t start installing the equipment until it arrives on the dock. But how about coordinating the installers to be on-site on the right day knowing that the company is drop shipping the equipment to three different receiving docks? That’s a bit harder.

Project managers need to know timelines for things because they have to juggle everything together. If you’ve ever had the misfortune to need to use a Gantt chart you’ll know what I’m talking about. These little jewels have all the timeline needs of a project visualized for everyone to figure out how to make things happen. Stable time is key to a project. Estimates need to make sense. You can’t just spitball something and hope it works. If part of your project timeline is off in either direction, you’re going to get messed up further down the line.

Predictability

Project timelines need to be consistent. Most people try to err on the side of caution when trying to make them work. They fudge the numbers and pad things out a bit so that everything will work out in the end. Even if that means that there may be a few hours when someone is sitting around with nothing to do.

I worked with a project manager that jokingly told me that the way he figured out the timing for an installation project was to take the units from his engineers and double it and move to the next time unit. So hours became days, and days became weeks. We chuckled about this at the time, but it also wasn’t surprising when their projects always seemed to talk a LOT longer than most people budgeted for.

The problem with inflated numbers is that no customer is going to want to pay for wasted time. If you think it’s hard to get a customer to buy off on an installation that might take 30 hours try getting them to pay when they are telling you your engineers were sitting around for 10 of those hours. Customers only want to pay for the hours worked, not the hours spent on the phone trying to locate shipments or trying to figure out what this weird error message is.

Likewise, trying to go the other direction and get things done more quickly than the estimate is a recipe for disaster too. There’s even a specific term for it: crashing (sounds great, eh?). Crashing a project means adding resources to a project or removing items from the critical execution path to make a deadline or complete something earlier. If you want a textbook example of why messing with a project timeline is a bad idea, go read or watch The Martian. The first resupply mission is a prime example of this practice in action and why it can go horribly wrong.

These are all great reasons why cloud is so appealing to people. Justin Warren (@JPWarren) did a great presentation a couple of years ago about what happens when projects run late and why cloud fixes that:

Watch that whole video and you’ll understand things from a project manager’s point of view. Cloud is predictable and stable and it always works the same way. The variance on things is tight. You don’t have to worry about projects slipping up or taking too much time. Cloud removes uncertainty and doubt about execution. That’s something that project managers love.


Tom’s Take

I used to get asked to quote my projected installation times to the sales managers for projects. Most of the time, I’d give them an estimate that I felt comfortable with and that would be the end of it. One day, I asked them about why a 10-hour project was quoted as 14 on an order. The sales manager told me that they’d developed “Tom Time”, which was 1.4 times the amount of whatever I quoted. So, 10 hours became 14 and 20 hours became 28, and so on. When I asked why I was told that engineers often run into problems and don’t think to account for it. So project managers need to build in the time somehow. Perhaps that’s one of the reasons why software defined and cloud are more attractive. Because there isn’t any Tom Time involved.

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Friday Musings on Network Analytics

I’ve been at Networking Field Day this week, and as always the conversations have been great and focused around a variety of networking topics. One that keeps jumping out at me is network analytics. There’s a few things that have come up that were especially interesting to me:

  • Don’t ask yourself if networking monitoring is not worth your time. Odds are good you’re already monitoring stuff in your network and you don’t even realize it. Many networking vendors enable basic analytics for troubleshooting purposes. You need to figure out how to build that into a bigger part of your workflows.
  • Remember that analytics can integrate with platforms you’re already using. If you’re using ServiceNow you can integrate everything into it. No better way to learn how analytics can help you than to setup some kind of ticket generation for down networks. And, if that automation causes you to get overloaded with link flaps you’ll have even more motivation to figure out why your provider can’t keep things running.
  • Don’t discount open source tools. The world has come a long way since MRTG and Cacti. In fact, a lot of the flagship analytics platforms are built with open source tools as a starting point. If you can figure out how to use the “free” versions, you can figure out how to implement the bigger stuff too. The paid versions may look nicer or have deeper integrations, but you can bet that they all work mostly the same under the hood.
  • Finally, remember that you can’t possible deal with all this data yourself. You can collect it but parsing it is like trying to drink from a firehose of pond water. You need to treat the data and then analyze that result. Find tools (probably open source) that help you understand what you’re seeing. If it saves you 10 minutes of looking, it’s worth it.

Tom’s Take

Be sure to say tuned to our Gestalt IT On-Premise IT Roundtable podcast in the coming weeks for more great discussion on the analytics topic. We’ve got an episode that should be out soon that will take the discussion of the “expense” of networking analytics in a new direction.

Independence, Impartiality, and Perspective

In case you haven’t noticed recently, there are a lot of people that have been going to work for vendors and manufacturers of computer equipment. Microsoft has scored more than a few of them, along with Cohesity, Rubrik, and many others. This is something that I see frequently from my position at Tech Field Day. We typically hear the rumblings of a person looking to move on to a different position early on because we talk to a great number of companies. We also hear about it because it represents a big shift for those who are potential delegates for our events. Because going to a vendor means loss of their independence. But what does that really mean?

Undeclaring Independence

When people go to work for a manufacturer of a computing product, the necessarily lose their independence. But that’s not the only case where that happens. You can also not be truly independent if you work for reseller. If your company specializes in Cisco and EMC, are you truly independent when discussion Juniper and NetApp? If you make your money by selling one group of products you’re going to be unconsciously biased toward them. If you’ve been burned or had the rug pulled out from under you by a vendor, you may be biased against them.

Likewise, if you work yourself in an independent consulting business, are you honestly and truly independent? That would mean you’re making no money from any vendor as your customer. That means no drafting of whitepapers, no testing, and no interaction with them that involves compensation. This falls into the same line of thinking as the reseller employee. Strictly speaking, you aren’t totally independent.

Independence would really mean not even being involved in the market. A public defender is truly independent of IT. A plumber is independent of IT. They don’t have biases. They don’t care either way what type of computer or network solution they use. But you don’t consider a public defender or a plumber to be an expert on IT. Because in order to know anything about IT you have to understand the companies. You have to talk to them and get what they’re doing. And that means you’re going to start forming opinions about them. But, truthfully, real independence is not what you’re looking for here.

Partial Neutrality

Instead of independence, which is a tricky subject, what you should look for is impartiality. Being impartial means treating everything fairly. You accept that you have bias and you try to overcome it. For example, judges are impartial. They have their own opinions and thoughts about subjects. They rule based on the law. They aren’t independent of the justice system. Instead, they do their best to use logic and rules to decide matters.

Likewise, people in IT should strive to be impartial. Instead of forming an opinion about something without thought we should try to look at all aspects of the ideas before we form our opinions. I used to be a huge fan of IBM Thinkpad laptops. I carried one for many years at my old job. Today, I’m a huge fan of MacBooks. I use one every day. Does that mean that I don’t like Windows laptops any more? It means that I don’t use them enough to have a solid opinion. I may compare some of the features I have on my current laptop against the ones that I see, but I also recognize that I am making that comparison and that I need to take it into account when I arrive at my decision.

Extending this further, when making decisions about how we analyze a solution from a company, we have to take into account how impartial we’re going to be in every direction. When you work for a company that makes a thing, whether it be a switch or a laptop or a car, you’re going to be partial to the thing you make. That’s just how people are. We like things we are involved in making. Does that mean we are incapable of admiring other things? No, but it does mean that we have some things to overcome to truly be impartial.

The hardest part of trying to be impartial is realizing when you aren’t. Unconscious bias creeps in all the time. Thoughts about the one time you used a bad product or ate bad food in a restaurant make you immediately start thinking about buying something else quickly. Even when it’s unfounded we still do it. And we have to recognize when we’re doing it in order to counter it.

Being impartial isn’t easy on purpose. Being able to look at all sides of an issue, both good and bad, takes a lot of extra effort. We don’t always like seeing the good in something we dislike or finding the bad parts of an opinion we agree with. But in order to be good judges of things we need to find the balance.


Tom’s Take

I try my best to be impartial. I know it’s hard to do. I have the fortune to be independent. Sure, I’m still a CCIE so I have a lot of Cisco knowledge. I also have a lot of relationships with people in the industry. A lot of those same people work at companies that are my customers. In the end, I have to realize that I need to work hard to be impartial every day. That’s the only way I can say that I’m independent and capable of evaluating things on their own merits. It’s just a matter of having the right perspective.

Finding Value in Cisco Live 2018

The world famous Cisco Live Sign picture, 2018 edition

Another Cisco Live has come and gone. Overall it was a fun time for many. Catching up with friends. Meeting people for the first time. Enjoying the balmy Orlando weather. It was a chance to relive some great times for every one. But does Cisco Live 2018 dictate how the future of the event will go?

Packing The Schedule

Did you get a chance to attend any of the social events at Cisco Live? There were a ton. There were Tweetups and meet ups and special sessions galore. There was every opportunity to visit a lounge or area dedicated to social media presence, Boomerang videos, goofy pictures, or global outreach. Every twenty feet had something for you to do or some way for you to make an impact.

In fact, if you went to all of these things you probably didn’t have time for much else. Definitely not time for the four or five keynote addresses. Or a certification test. Or the classes and sessions. In fact, if you tried to do everything there was to do at Cisco Live, you’d probably not sleep the whole week. There’s almost as much stuff to do outside the conference sessions as there is to do in them.

But is it too much? Are the activities around the learning sessions taking away from the conference itself? Think about something like the Big Ideas theater this year. In theory, it’s a great way to get people to attend sessions that are not specifically related to tech. You can introduce new ideas, especially those that are focused more on changing the world. But you’re also competing for time away from sessions that are focused on new products or building better architectures.

Every booth in the World of Solutions is designed to draw you in and keep you there. For the sponsors of the event it’s important to have conversations about their products and solutions. For Cisco people, it’s almost like they’re competing with the sessions to give you different content or a chance to interview people. Is that how things should be? I can understand the desire of DevNet wanting to change the way people look at programmable networking, for example. But every other little booth like Cisco Advanced Services or the Emergency Response Vehicle? Those feel more like attractions designed to show off rather than educate.

Paying the Piper

And what does all this cost in the long run? Sure, I love having extra features around the conference as much as the next person. But to what end? Things don’t pay for themselves. Every conference has a budget. Every piece of entertainment and every showcase booth costs money in some way or another. And how does that all get paid for? By us, the attendees.

It’s no secret that attending conferences isn’t cheap. A full conference pass for Cisco Live is around $2,000. In the past, there were cheaper options for just attending for the people networking aspect of things. But, with the growth of DevNet and other “included” options at the conference, Cisco needed to find a way to pay for them this year.

I’m not going to spend a lot of time going into the Imagine Pass issue right now because I want to sit down and have an honest discussion with Cisco about the pros and cons of the approach. But it is very important that we examine what we’re getting for the increased cost. There has to be a significant value for people to want to be a part of the event if the costs go up. The way to do that is to create compelling reasons to want to be at Cisco Live.

The way not to do that is to lock the content behind gates. Some of the things at Cisco Live this year were placed in areas that were not easy to access. One of my personal pet peeves is the NetVet lounge. I’m going to start this off by saying that I was a NetVet for many years before I moved to Tech Field Day. I’m no longer a NetVet. However, until 2013 the NetVet lounge was one of the de facto social hangout places. Now, it’s another area where you can get coffee and snacks.

Why does the NetVet lounge bother me? Because of the placement. Front and center across the aisle from the on-site Cisco Store (which took the place of the Social Media hub from 2013). Why does the NetVet lounge get to be outside the World of Solutions? Aside from the historical reasons, I can’t think of a good reason. You need to have a full conference pass to achieve NetVet status. A full conference pass gets you into the World of Solutions. Why not have NetVets meet there?

The obvious reason is that the World of Solutions closes. Yet the NetVet lounge does too. And the hours are pretty similar. Why not move the NetVet lounge into the World of Solutions and give that space to the Social Media folks. There are no restrictions on getting into the Social Media Hub. Why not have them front and center? Again, aside from the “tradition” of having the NetVet lounge outside the World of Solutions I can’t think of a good reason.


Tom’s Take

I love Cisco Live. I realized this year that I’ve been to thirteen of them. Every year since 2006. The conference has changed and grown. The focus has shifted. But the people remain the same. With the changes in the way that the pass structure the people may not be there much longer. We, as IT professionals, need to decide what’s important and give some feedback. We need to make it constructive and honest. Point out what works and what doesn’t. Don’t whine, but offer direct criticism. We can only make the conference we want by telling the people what we need. That’s how you make Cisco Live a place to be for now and for the future.

Conference Impostor Syndrome

In IT we’ve all heard of Impostor Syndrome by now. The feeling that you’re not just a lucky person that has no real skills or is skating by on the seat of their pants is a very real thing. I’ve felt it an many of my friends and fellow members of the community have felt it too. It’s easy to deal with when you have time to think or work on your own. However, when you take your show on the road it can creep up before you know it.

Conferences are a great place to meet people and learn about new ideas. It’s also a place where your ideas will be challenged and put on display. It’s not to difficult to imagine meeting a person for the first time at a place like Cisco Live or VMworld and not feeling little awe-inspired. After all, this could be a person whose works you’ve read for a long time. It could be a person you look up to or someone you would like to have mentor you.

For those in the position of being thrust into the limelight, it can be extremely difficult to push aside those feelings of Impostor Syndrome or even just a general level of anxiety. When people are coming up to you and thanking you for the content you create or even taking it to further extremes, like bowing for example, it can feel like you’re famous and admired for nothing at all.

What the members of the community have to realize is that these feelings are totally natural. You’re well within your rights to want to shy away from attention or be modest. This is doubly true for those of us that are introverts, which seems to happen in higher numbers in IT.

How can you fight these feelings?

Realize You Are Enough. I know it sounds silly to say it but you have to realize that you are enough. You are the person that does what they can every day to make the world a better place in every way you can. It might be something simple like tweeting about a problem you fixed. It may be as impressive as publishing your own network automation book. But you still have to stop and realize you are enough to accomplish your goals.

For those out there that want to tell their heroes and mentors in the community how awesome they are, remember that you’re also forcing them to look at themselves in a critical light sometimes. Some reassurances like, “I love the way you write” or “Your ability to keep the podcast going smoothly” are huge compliments that people appreciate. Because they represent skills that are honed and practiced.

Be The Best You That You Can Be. This one sounds harder than it might actually be. Now that you’ve admitted that you’re enough, you need to keep being the best person that you can be. Maybe that’s continuing to write great content. Maybe it’s something as simple as taking a hour out of your day to learn a new topic or interact with some new people on social media. It’s important that you take your skill set and use it to make things better overall for everyone.

For those out there that are amazed at the amount of content that someone can produce or the high technical quality of what they’re working on, remember that we’re all the same. We all have the same 24 hours in the day to do what we do. So the application of the time spent studying or learning about something is what separates leaders from the pack.

Build Up Others Slowly. This one is maybe the hardest of all. When you’re talking to people and building them up from nothing, you need to be sure to take your time in bringing them along. You can’t just swamp them with knowledge and minute details about their life that have gleaned from reading blogs or LinkedIn. You need, instead, to bring people along slowly and build them up from nothing into the greatest person that you know.

This works in reverse as well. Don’t walk up to someone and start listing off their requirements like a resume. Instead, give them some time to discuss it with you. Let the person you’re talking to dictate a portion of the conversation. Even though you may feel the need to overwhelm with information to justify the discussion you should let them come to their place when they are ready. That prevents the feeling of being overwhelmed and makes the conversation much, much easier.


Tom’s Take

It’s very easy to get lost in the world of feeling inadequate about what others think of you. It goes from adulation and excitement to an overwhelming sense of dread that you’re going to let people down. You have to fix that by realizing that you’re enough and doing the best you can with what you have. If you can say that emphatically about yourself then you are well on the way to ensuring that Conference Imposter Syndrome is something you won’t have to worry about.

Avoiding A MacGyvered Network

Ivan Pepelnjak has an interesting post up today about MacGyver-ing in the network. He and Simon Milhomme are right that most small-to-medium sized networks are pretty much non-reference architectures and really, really difficult to manage and maintain properly on the best of days. On the worst of days, they’re a nightmare that make you want to run screaming into the night. But why?

One Size Never Fits All

Part of the issue is that reference architectures and cookie-cutter designs aren’t made for SMEs. Sure, the large enterprise and cloud providers have their own special snowflakes. But so too do small IT shops that have been handed a pile of parts and told to make it work.

People like Greg Ferro and Peyton Maynard-Koran believe this is due to vendors and VARs pushing hardware and sales cycles like crazy. I have attributed it to the lack of real training and knowledge about networking. But, it also has a lot to do with the way that people see IT as a cost center. We don’t provide value like marketing. We don’t collect checks like accounting. At best, we’re no different than the utility companies. We’re here because we have to be.

Likewise, when IT is forced into making decisions based on some kind of rebate or sale we tend to get stuck with the blame when things don’t work correctly. People that wouldn’t bat an eye at buying a new Rolex or BMW get downright frugal when they’re deciding which switches to buy to run their operation for the next 10 years. So, they compromise. Surely you all can make this switch work? It only has half the throughput as the one you originally specced but it was on sale!

So, stuck with bad decisions and no real documentation or reference points, we IT wizards do what we can with what we have. Just like Angus MacGyver. Sure, those networks are a pain to manage. They’re a huge issue when it’s time to upgrade to the next discount switch. And given the number of fires that we have to fight on a daily basis we never get a chance to go back and fix when we nailed up in the first place. Nothing is more permanent than a temporary fix. And no install lasts longer than one that was prefaced with “let me just get this working for the next week”.

Bespoke Off The Rack

So, how do we fix the MacGyver-ing? It’s not going to be easy. It’s going to be painful and require us to step out of our comfort zones.

  1. Shut Up And Do As I Say. This one is hard. Instead of having management breathing down your neck to get something installed or working on their schedule, you need to push back. You need to tell people that rushing is only going to complicate things. You need to fire back when someone hands you equipment that doesn’t meet your spec. You need to paraphrase the famous Shigeru Miyamoto – “A delayed network is eventually good, but a rushed installation is bad forever.”
  2. Document Like It Will Be Read Aloud In Court. Documentation isn’t just a suggestion. It’s a necessity. We’ve heard about the “hit by a bus” test. It’s more than just that, though. You need to not only be able to replace yourself but also to be able to have references for why you made the decisions you did. MacGyver-ing happens when we can’t remember why we made the decisions we did. It happens when we need to come up with a last minute solution to an impossible problem created by other people (NSFW language). Better to have that solution documented in full so you know what’s going on three years from now.
  3. Plan Like It’s Happening Tomorrow. Want to be ready for a refresh? Plan it today. Come back to your plan. Have a replacement strategy for every piece of equipment in your organization. Refresh the plan every few months. When someone comes to you with a new idea or a new thing, write up a plan. Yes, it’s going to be a lot of spinning your wheels. but it’s also going to be a better solution when someone comes to you and says that it’s time to make a project happen. Then, all you need to do is pull out your plan and make it happen. Imagine it like the opposite of a DR plan – Instead of the worst case scenario this is your chance to make it the best case.

Tom’s Take

There’s a reason the ringtone on my phone has been the theme from MacGyver for the last 15 years. I’m good at building something out of nothing. Making things work when they shouldn’t. And, as bad as it sounds, sometimes that’s what’s needed. Especially in the VAR world. But it shouldn’t be standard operating procedure. Instead, make your plan, execute it when the time comes, and make sure no one pushes you into a situation where MacGyver-ing is the last option you have.

Time To Get Back To Basics?

I’ve had some fascinating networking discussions over the past couple of weeks at Dell Technologies World, Interop, and the spring ONUG meeting. But two of them have hit on some things that I think need to be addressed in the industry. Both Russ White and Ignas Bagdonas of the IETF have come to me and talked about how they feel networking professionals have lost sight of the basics.

How Stuff Works

If you walk up to any network engineer and ask them to explain how TCP works, you will probably get a variety of answers. Some will try to explain it to you in basic terms to avoid getting too in depth. Others will swamp you with a technical discussion that would make the protocol inventors proud. But still others will just shrug their shoulders and admit they don’t really understand the protocol.

It’s a common problem when a technology gets to the point of being mature and ubiquitous. One of my favorite examples is the fuel system on an internal combustion engine. On older cars or small engines, the carburetor is responsible for creating the correct fuel and air mixture that is used to power the cylinders. Getting that mix right is half science and half black magic. For the people that know how to do it properly it’s an easy thing that they can do to drive the maxim performance from an engine. For those that have tried it and failed, it’s something best left alone to run at defaults.

The modern engine uses fuel injection. It’s a black box. It can be reprogrammed or tinkered with but it’s something that is tuned in different ways from the traditional carburetor. It’s not something that’s designed to be played around with unless you really know what you’re doing. The technology has reached the point where it’s ubiquitous and easy to use, but very difficult to repair without a specialized skill set.

Most regular car drivers will look under the hood and quickly realize they know nothing about what’s going on. Some technical folks will be able to figure out what certain parts do by observing their behavior. But if you ask those same people how a fuel injection system or carburetor works they’ll probably give you a blank stare.

That’s the issue we find in modern networking. We’ve been creating VLANs and BGP route maps for years. Some people have spent their entire careers tuning multicast or optimizing layer 2 interconnects. But if you corner them and ask them how the protocol works or how best to design an architecture that takes advantage of their life’s work they can’t tell you aside from referencing some old blog post or some vendor’s validated design on their hardware.

Russ and Ignas each touch on something important. In the good old days before there were a hundred certification guides and a thousand SRNDs people had to do real work to find the best solution for a problem. They had to put pencil to paper and sort out the mess before they could make something work. That’s where the engineering side of the network comes from.

Today, it’s more “plug and play”. You drop in pieces of a solution and they should work together. In practice, that usually means all the pieces have to be from the same vendor or from approved partner sources. And anything that goes awry will need a team of experts and many, many consulting hours to figure out.

Imagine if we could only install networks without understanding how they work. Could you see a world where everything we install from a networking perspective is a black box like a fuel injector? That’s the case to a certain degree with cloud networking today. We don’t see what’s going on under the surface. We can only see what the interface exposes to us. That’s fine as long as the applications we are using support the things we’re trying to do with them. But when it comes to being able to fix the network at the level we’re used to seeing it could be difficult if not downright impossible.

Learning The Ropes

But, moreover, are the networking professionals that are configuring these networks even capable of making those changes? Does anyone other than Narbik really understand how EIGRP works? Facebook seems to think that lightweight messaging packets for routing protocols are outdated. So they used ZeroMQ without understanding why that’s a bad idea for slow speed links. They may understand how a routing protocol works in theory, but they don’t completely understand how it’s supposed to work in extreme cases.

Can we teach people the basics and understanding of protocols and design that they need in order to make proper designs outside of vendor reference documents? It’s a tall order for sure. Most blog posts are designed to talk about features or solve problems. Most literature from creators is designed to make their new widget work correctly. Very little documentation exists about integration or design. And a good portion of what does exist is a bit outmoded and needs to be spruced up.

We, as the stewards of networking, need to help this process along. We need to spend more time talking about design and theory. We need to dissect protocols and help people understand how to use the tools they have rather than hoping someone will build the best mousetrap ever to solve each piece of a complicated puzzle. We need to teach people to be thinkers and problem solvers. And, yes, that does mean a bit less complaining about things like vendor code quality and VAR behavior.

Why? Because those people are empowered by a lack of knowledge. Customers aren’t idiots. They have business reasons for the things they do. Our technology needs to support their business needs. Yes, that means we need to think critically about what we’re doing. And yes, they may mean eating our words now and then to avoid a showdown about something that’s ultimately unimportant in the long run.

If we increase the amount of knowledge about the important topics like design and protocols it should make the overall level of understanding go up for everyone. That means better designs. More integrated technology. Less reliance on being force-fed the bare minimum information necessary to make things work. And that means things will run faster and much more smoothly. Which is a win for everyone.


Tom’s Take

I’ll be the first to admit that I don’t know the dirty mechanics of Frame Relay switching or how to tune OSPF Hello timers for non-standard link types. It’s a skill I don’t use every day. But I know where to find them if I need them. And I know that it can help in certain situations where you see odd protocol behavior. Likewise, I know that if I need to go design a network for someone I need to get a lot of information about business needs and build the best network I can with the constraints that I have. Things like budget and time are universal. But one of those constraints shouldn’t be lack of knowledge about protocols and good design. Those are two things that should be ingrained into anyone that wants to have a title of “senior” anything.