OpenConfig and Wi-Fi – The Winning Combo


Wireless isn’t easy by any stretch of the imagination. Most people fixate on the spectrum analysis part of the equation when they think about how hard wireless is. But there are many other moving parts in the whole architecture that make it difficult to manage and maintain. Not the least of which is how the devices talk to each other.

This week at Aruba Atmosphere 2019, I had the opportunity to moderate a panel of wireless and security experts for Mobility Field Day Exclusive. It was a fun discussion, as you can see from the above video. As the moderator, I didn’t really get a change to explain my thoughts on OpenConfig, but I figured now would be a great time to jump in with some color on my side of the conversation.

Yin and YANG

One of the most exciting ideas behind OpenConfig for wireless people should be the common YANG data models. This means that you can use NETCONF to have a common programming language against specific YANG models. That means no more fumbling around to remember esoteric commands. You just tell the system what you want it to do and the rest is easy.

As outlined in the video, this has a huge impact on trying to keep configurations standard across different types of APs. Imagine the nightmare of trying to configure power settings or radio thresholds with 3 or more AP manufacturers in your building. Now, imagine being able to do it across your building or dozens of others with a few simple commands and some programming know-how? Doesn’t seem quite as daunting now, does it? It’s easy because you’re speaking the same language across all those APs.

So, what if you don’t care, like Richard McIntosh (@802TopHat) points out? What if your vendor doesn’t support OpenConfig? Well, that’s fine. Not everyone has to support it today. But if you work on building a model system and setting up the automation and API interfaces, are you just going to throw it out the window during your refresh cycle because the new APs that you’re buying don’t support OpenConfig? Or is the need for OpenConfig going to be a huge driver for you and part of the selection process.

Companies are motived by their customers. If you tell them that they need to develop OpenConfig for their devices, they will do it because they run the risk of losing sales. And if the industry moves toward adopting a standard northbound API, what happens to those that get left out in the cold after a few missed refresh cycles? I bet they’ll quickly realize the lost opportunities more than cover the development costs of supporting OpenConfig.

Telemetry Short-Cuts

The other big piece of OpenConfig and wireless is telemetry. SNMP-based monitoring doesn’t work well in today’s wired networks and it’s downright broken in wireless. There are too many variables out there in the average deployment to be able to account for them with anything other than telemetry. Many vendors are starting to adopt the idea of streaming the data directly to collectors via a subscription model. OpenConfig makes this easy with the ability to subscribe to the data you want using OpenConfig models.

From a manufacturer perspective, this is a huge chance to get into telemetry and offer it as a differentiator. If you’re not tied to using an archaic platform with proprietary data models you can embrace OpenConfig and deliver a modern telemetry infrastructure that users will want to adopt. And if the radio performance is the same between all of the offerings, telemetry could be a the piece that tips the scales in your favor.

Single-Vendor Isn’t So Single

I remember doing a deployment for a wireless system once that was “state of the art” when we put it in. I had my challenges and made everything work well and the customer was happy. Until a month later when the supporting vendor announced they were buying a competing company and using that company as their offering going forward. My customer was upset, naturally, but so was I. I spent a lot of time working out how to build and deploy that system and now it was on the scrap heap.

It’s even worse when you keep buying from single vendors and suddenly find that the new products don’t quite conform to the same syntax or capabilities. Maybe the new model of router or AP has a new board that is 95% compatible with the old one, except of that one command you use all the time.

OpenConfig can change that. Because the capabilities of the device have to be outlined you can easily figure out if there are any missing parts and pieces. You can also be sure that your provisioning scripts and programs aren’t going to break or cause problems because a critical command was deprecated. And since you can keep the models around for old hardware as well as new you aren’t going to be duplicating efforts everywhere trying to keep things moving between the platforms.


Tom’s Take

OpenConfig is a great idea for any system that has distributed components. Even if it never takes off in Wi-Fi, it will force the manufacturers to do a bit better job of documenting their capabilities and making them easy to consume via API. And anything that exposes more functionality to be consumed by automation and programmability is a good thing indeed.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s