The People Versus Security


PinkLock

It all comes back to people. People are the users of the system. They are the source of great imagination and great innovation. They are also the reason why security professionals pull their hair out day in and day out. Because computer systems don’t have the capability to bypass, invalidated, and otherwise screw up security quite like a living, breathing human being.

Climb Every Mountain

Security is designed to make us feel safe. Door locks keep out casual prowlers. Alarm systems alert us when our home or business is violated. That warm fuzzy feeling we get when we know the locks are engaged and we are truly secure is one of bliss.

But when security gets in our way, it’s annoying. Think of all the things in your life that would be easier if people just stopped trying to make you secure. Airport security is the first that comes to mind. Or the annoying habit of needing to show your ID when you make a credit card purchase. How about systems that scan your email for data loss prevention (DLP) purposes and kick back emails with sensitive data that you absolutely need to share?

Security only benefits us when it’s unobtrusive yet visibly reassuring. People want security that works yet doesn’t get in their way. And when it does, they will go out of their way to do anything they can to bypass it. Some of the most elaborate procedures I’ve ever seen to get around security lockouts happened because people pushed back against the system.

Cases in point? The US Air Force was forced to put a code on nuclear missiles to protect them from being accidentally launched at the height of the cold war. What did they make that code? 00000000. No, really. How about the more recent spate of issues with the US transition to Chip-and-Signature credit card authentication as opposed to the old swipe method? Just today I was confronted with a card reader that had a piece of paper shoved in the chip reader slot saying “Please Swipe”. Reportedly it’s because transactions are taking 10 seconds or more to process. Much more secure for sure, but far too slow for busy people on the go, I guess.

Computers don’t get imaginative when it comes to overcoming security. They follow the rules. When something happens that violates a rule or triggers a policy to deny an action that policy rule is executed. No exceptions. When an incoming connection is denied at a firewall, that connection is dropped. When the rule says to allow it then it is allowed. Computers are very binary like that (yes, pun intended).

Bring The Mountain To Them

We’ve spent a huge amount of time and effort making security unobtrusive. Think of Apple’s Touch ID. It created a novel and secure way to encourage users to put passcode locks on phones. People can now just unlock their phone with a thumbprint instead of a long passcode. Yet even Touch ID was slow at first. It took some acclimation. And when it was sped up to the point where it caused issues for the way people checked their phones for notifications and such. Apple has even gone to greater lengths in iOS 10 to introduce features to get around the fast Touch ID authentication times caused by new sensors.

Technology will always be one or more steps ahead of where people want it to be. It will always work faster than people think and cause headaches when it behaves in a contrary way. The key to solving security issues related to people is not to try and outsmart them with a computer. People are far too inventive to lose that battle. Even the most computer illiterate person can find a way to bypass a lockout or write a domain administrator password on a sticky note.


Tom’s Take

We need to teach people to think about security from a perspective of need. Why do we have complex passwords? Why do we need to rotate them? Why do the doors of a mantrap open separately? People can understand security when it’s explained in a way that makes them understand the purpose. They still may not like it, but at least they won’t be trying to circumvent it any longer. We hope.

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