Networking Needs Information, Not Data


GameAfoot

Networking Field Day 12 starts today. There are a lot of great presenters lined up. As I talk to more and more networking companies, it’s becoming obvious that simply moving packets is not the way to go now. Instead, the real sizzle is in telling you all about those packets instead. Not packet inspection but analytics.

Tell Me More, Tell Me More

Ask any networking professional and they’ll tell you that the systems they manage have a wealth of information. SNMP can give you monitoring data for a set of points defined in database files. Other protocols like NetFlow or sFlow can give you more granular data about a particular packet group of data flow in your network. Even more advanced projects like Intel’s Snap are building on the idea of using telemetry to collect disparate data sources and build collection methodologies to do something with them.

The concern that becomes quickly apparent is the overwhelming amount of data being received from all these sources. It reminds me a bit of this scene:

How can you drink from this firehose? Maybe you should be asking if you should instead?

Order From Chaos

Data is useless. We need to perform analysis on it to get information. That’s where a new wave of companies is coming into the networking market. They are building on the frameworks and systems that are aggregating data and presenting it in a way that makes it useful information. Instead of random data points about NetFlow, these solutions tell you that you’ve got a huge problem with outbound traffic of a specific type that is sent at a specific time with a specific payload. The difference is that instead of sorting through data to make sense of it, you’ve got a tool delivering the analysis instead of the raw data.

Sometimes it’s as simple as color-coding lines of Wireshark captures. Resets are bad, so they show up red. Properly torn down connections are good so they are green. You can instantly figure out how good things are going by looking for the colors. That’s analysis from raw data. The real trick in modern networking monitoring is to find a way to analyze and provide context for massive amounts of data that may not have an immediate correlation.

Networking professionals are smart people. They can intuit a lot of potential issues from a given data set. They can make the logical leap to a specific issue given time. What reduces that ability is the sheer amount of things that can go wrong with a particular system and the speed at which those problems must be fixed, especially at scale. A hiccup on one end of the network can be catastrophic on the others if allowed to persist.

Analytics can give us the context we need. It can provide confidence levels for common problems. It can ensure that symptoms are indeed happening above a given baseline or threshold. It can help us narrow the symptoms and potential issues before we even look at the data. Analytics can exclude the impossible while highlighting the more probably causes and outcomes. Analytics can give us peace of mind.


Tom’s Take

Analytics isn’t doing our job for us. Instead, it’s giving us the ability to concentrate. Anyone that spends their time sifting through data to try and find patterns is losing the signal in the noise. Patterns are things that software can find easily. We need to leverage the work being put into network analytics systems to help us track down the issues before they blow up into full problems. We need to apply the thing that makes network professionals the best suited to look at the best information we can gather about a situation. Our concentration on what matters is where our job will be in five years. Let’s take the knowledge we have and apply it.

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One thought on “Networking Needs Information, Not Data

  1. Pingback: Worth Reading: Networking needs information, not data - 'net work

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