Designer or Architect? It’s A Matter Of Choice


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I had a great time at ONUG this past week. I got to hear a lot of great presentations from some great people, and I got a chance to catch up with some friends as well. One of those was Pete Lumbis (@PeteCCDE) who had a great presentation this past spring at Interop. We talked a lot about tech and networking, but one topic he brought up that made me stop and think for a moment was the wide gulf between design and architecture.

Binary Designers

Design is a critical part of an IT project. Things must fit and make sense before the implementors can figure out how to put the pieces together. Design is all about building a list of products and describing how they’ll interact once turned on. Proper design requires you to step away from the keyboard for a moment and think about a bigger picture than just hacking CLI commands or Python code to make some lights start blinking in the right order.

But design is inherently limited. Think about the last design you did, whether it be wireless or networking or even storage. When you start a design, you automatically make assumptions about what’s going on in the scenario. Perhaps they want to expand their near-line storage capacity. That brings a set of products into play that you choose from. But what if the goal is something different? What if they want a fast caching tier? What if the goal is to create a new pod for object storage?

All of these scenarios are broad enough to require a designer to come up with a good mix of products to fulfill the goals of the project. But the designer has already had assumptions put down for them: The scope and the requirements are pre-determined for them before they ever start thinking about the technology that will be involved in the setup.

Design is all about choices. You have to choose the right product to meet the goals. Once you know the product, you have to make the right choices about which set of products to use? The orange ones or the blue ones? The cheap ones or the expensive ones? Design is about making good choices so implementers can focus on making those choices work.

Visionary Architects

Architecture, on the other hand, has very little to do with choice. Architects are idea people. They look at a problem faced by an organization and try to narrow the focus of the issue to make the designer’s choices easier. Architects don’t worry about individual products or even minor solution sets. They focus on technology areas.

Think back to our storage problem from above. How did the designer arrive at the near-line storage decision? Or the object storage idea? It’s because an architect is the one driving those ideas from a higher level. Architects may not know how to build an object storage bill of materials or how to assemble a chassis switch but they do know what those are used for. Architects instead know that you should be using flash storage in lower density, faster reaction systems when cost is sensitive. They know that a rack may only need a 1U ToR switch instead of a chassis if that ToR switch doesn’t have to provide power or advanced features. They won’t know the specific part number, but they know the technology.

Architects have vision. Designers know products. They need each other to make solutions work and designs happen. The same person can fulfill both roles provided they understand how things break down in the end. A designer architect needs to know that the solutions to customer problems should come before any decisions are made about products. Too often, we find ourselves cornered in a mess because the product mix was decided before the solution was determined.

It’s like trying to bake a cake when all you have in the house is flour, eggs, and swiss cheese. Maybe a cake isn’t what you should be making. The architect would realize that the problem is a limited set of ingredients. instead of deciding on a cake, the architect can work with the designer to find a solution to the problem of food with limited ingredients. Perhaps the designer realizes what’s needed is a soufflé instead. The team figures out the problem with the best design instead of deciding on a design before knowing what the problem is.


Tom’s Take

I was a designer in my past life at a VAR. I still had to implement my designs at the end of the day, but I was the one making the decisions about the products that were needed to meet the solutions my customers had to have. Now, at Tech Field Day I understand the technology at an architecture level. I know why you need this solution for that problem. My ability to hack CLI has gone down a bit but my understanding of the bigger picture has increased several times over that. I now think that I have a better idea of what needs to happen to make tech work the right way and be implemented easier when the architect’s vision can solve the problems that allows the designers to make the right choices.

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One thought on “Designer or Architect? It’s A Matter Of Choice

  1. Pingback: Designer or Architect? It’s A Matter Of Choice - Tech Field Day

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