Security and Salt


One of the things I picked up during the quarantine is a new-found interest in cooking. I’ve been spending more time researching recipes and trying to understand how my previous efforts to be a four-star chef have fallen flat. Thankfully, practice does indeed make perfect. I’m slowly getting better , which is to say that my family will actually eat my cooking now instead of just deciding that pizza for the fourth night in a row is a good choice.

One of the things I learned as I went on was about salt. Sodium Chloride is a magical substance. Someone once told me that if you taste a dish and you know it needs something but you’re not quite sure what that something is, the answer is probably salt. It does a lot to tie flavors together. But it’s also a fickle substance. It has the power to make or break a dish in very small amounts. It can be the difference between perfection and disaster. As it turns out, it’s a lot like security too.

Too Much is Exactly Enough

Security and salt are alike in the first way because you need the right amount to make things work. You have to have a minimum amount of both to make something viable. If you don’t have enough salt in your dish you won’t be able to taste it. But you also won’t be able to pull the flavors in the dish together with it. So you have to work with a minimum. Whether its a dash or salt or a specific minimum security threshold, you have to have enough to matter otherwise it’s the same as not having it at all.

To The Salt Mines

Likewise, the opposite effect is also detrimental. If you need to have the minimum amount to be effective, the maximum amount of both salt and security is bad. We all know what happens when we put too much salt into a dish. You can’t eat it at all. While there are tricks to getting too much salt out of a dish they change the overall flavor profile of whatever you’re making. Even just a little too much salt is very apparent depending on the dish you’re trying to make. Likewise, too much security is a deterrent to getting actual work done. Restrictive controls get in the way of productivity and ultimately lead to people trying to work out solutions that don’t solve the problem but instead try to bypass the control.

Now you may be saying to yourself, “So, the secret is to add just the right amount of security, right?” And you would be correct. But what is the right amount? Well, it’s not unlike trying to measure salt by sight instead of using a measuring device. Have you ever seen a chef or TV host pour an amount of salt into their hands and say it needs “about that much”? Do you know how they know how much salt to add? It’s not rocket science. Instead, it’s the tried-and-true practice of practice. They know about how much salt a dish needs for a given cooking time or flavor profile. They may have even made the dish a few times in order to understand when it might need more or less salt. They know that starches need more salt and delicate foods need less. Most importantly, they measured how much salt they can hold in their cupped hand. So they know what a teaspoon and tablespoon of salt look like in their palm.

How is this like security? Most Infosec professionals know inherently how to make things more secure. Their experience and their training tell them how much security to add to a system to make it more secure without putting too much in place to impede the operations of the system. They know where to put an IPS to provide maximum coverage without creating too many false positives. And they can do that because they have the experience to know how to do it right without guessing. Because the odds are good they’ve done it wrong at least one time.

The last salty thing to remember is that even when you have the right amounts down to a science you’re still going to need to figure out how to make it perfect. Potato soup is a notoriously hard dish to season properly. As mentioned above, starchy foods tend to soak up salt. You can fix a salty dish by putting a piece of a potato in it to soak up the salt. But is also means that it’s super hard to get it right when everything in your dish soaks up salt. But the best chefs can get it right. Because they know where to start and they know to test the dish before they do more. They know they need to start from a safe setup and push out from there without ruining everything. They know that no exact amount is the same between two dishes and the only way to make sure it’s right is to test until you get it right. Then make notes so you know how to make it better the next time.


Tom’s Take

Salt is one of my downfalls. I tend to like things salty, so I put too much in when I taste things. It’s never too salty for me unless my mouth shrinks up like a desiccated dish. That’s why I also have to rely on my team at home to help me understand when something is just right for them so I don’t burn out their taste buds either. Security is the same. You need a team that understands everything from their own perspective so they can help you get it right all over. You can’t take salt out of a dish without a massive crutch. And you can’t really reduce too much security without causing issues like budge overruns or costly meetings to decide what to remove. It’s better to get your salt and your security right in the first place.

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