The Mystery of Known Issues


I’ve spent the better part of the last month fighting a transient issue with my home ISP. I thought I had it figure out after a hardware failure at the connection point but it crept back up after I got back from my Philmont trip. I spent a lot of energy upgrading my home equipment firmware and charting the seemingly random timing of the issue. I also called the technical support line and carefully explained what I was seeing and what had been done to work on the problem already.

The responses usually ranged from confused reactions to attempts to reset my cable modem, which never worked. It took several phone calls and lots of repeated explanations before I finally got a different answer from a technician. It turns out there was a known issue with the modem hardware! It’s something they’ve been working on for a few weeks and they’re not entirely sure what the ultimate fix is going to be. So for now I’m going to have to endure the daily resets. But at least I know I’m not going crazy!

Issues for Days

Known issues are a way of life in technology. If you’ve worked with any system for any length of time you’ve seen the list of things that aren’t working or have weird interactions with other things. Given the increasing amount of interactions that we have with systems that are becoming more and more dependent on things it’s a wonder those known issue lists are miles long by now.

Whether it’s a bug or an advisory or a listing of an incompatibility on a site, the nature of all known issues is the same. They are things that don’t work that we can’t fix yet. They could be on a list of issues to resolve or something that may never be able to be fixed. The key is that we know all about them so we can plan around them. Maybe it’s something like a bug in a floating point unit that causes long division calculations to be inaccurate to a certain number of decimal places. If you know what the issue is you know how to either plan around it or use something different. Maybe you don’t calculate to that level of precision. Maybe you do that on a different system with another chip. Whatever the case, you need to know about the issue before you can work around it.

Not all known issues are publicly known. They could involve sensitive information about a system. Perhaps the issue itself is a potential security risk. Most advisories about remote exploits are known issues internally at companies before they are patched. While they aren’t immediately disclosed they are eventually found out when the patch is released or when someone discovers the same issue outside of the company researchers. Putting these kinds of things under an embargo of sorts isn’t always bad if it protects from a wider potential to exploit them. However, the truth must eventually come out or things can’t get resolved.

Knowing the Unknown

What happens when the reasons for not disclosing known problems are less than noble? What if the reasoning behind hiding an issue has more to do with covering up bad decision making or saving face or even keeping investors or customers from fleeing? Welcome to the dark side of disclosure.

When I worked from Gateway 2000 back in the early part of the millennium, we had a particularly nasty known issue in the system. The ultimate root cause was that the capacitors on a series of motherboards were made with poor quality controls or bad components and would swell and eventually explode, causing the system to come to a halt. The symptoms manifested themselves in all manner of strange ways, like race conditions or random software errors. We would sometimes spend hours troubleshooting an unrelated issue only to find out the motherboard was affected with “bad caps”.

The issue was well documented in the tech support database for the affected boards. Once we could determine that it was a capacitor issue it was very easy to get the parts replaced. Getting to that point was the trick, though. Because at the top of the article describing the problem was a big, bold statement:

Do Not Tell The Customer This Is A Known Issue!!!

What? I can’t tell them that their system has an issue that we need to correct before everything pops and shuts it down for good? I can’t even tell them what to look for specifically when we open the case? Have you ever tried to tell a 75-year-old grandmother to look for something “strange” in a computer case? You get all kinds of fun answers!

We ended up getting creative in finding ways to look for those issues and getting them replaced where we could. When I moved on to my next job working for a VAR, I found out some of those same machines had been sold to a customer. I opened the case and found bad capacitors right away. I told my manager and explained the issue and we started getting them replaced under warranty as soon as the first sign of problems happened. After the warranty expired we kept ordering good boards from suppliers until we were able to retire all of those bad machines. If I hadn’t have known about the bad cap issue from my help desk time I never would have known what to look for.

Known issues like these are exactly the kind of thing you need to tell your customers about. It’s something that impacts their computer. It needs to be fixed. Maybe the company didn’t want to have to replace thousands of boards at once. Maybe they didn’t want to have to admit they cut corners when they were buying the parts and now the money they saved is going to haunt them in increased support costs. Whatever the reason it’s not the fault of the customer that the issue is present. They should have the option to get things fixed properly. Hiding what has happened is only going to create stress for the relations between consumer and provider.

Which brings me back to my issue from above. Maybe it wasn’t “known” when I called the first time. But by the third or fourth time I called about the same thing they should have been able to tell me it’s a known problem with this specific behavior and that a fix is coming soon. The solution wasn’t to keep using the first-tier support fixes of resets or transfers to another department. I would have appreciated knowing it was an issue so I didn’t have to spend as much time upgrading and isolating and documenting the hell out of everything just to exclude other issues. After all, my troubleshooting skills haven’t disappeared completely!

Vendors and providers, if you have a known issue you should admit it. Be up front. Honestly will get you far in this world. Tell everyone there’s a problem and you’re working on a fix that you don’t have just yet. It may not make the customer happy at first but they’ll understand a lot more than hiding it for days or weeks while you scramble to fix it without telling anyone. If that customer has more than a basic level of knowledge about systems they’ll probably be able to figure it out anyway and then you’re going to be the one with egg on your face when they tell you all about the problem you don’t want to admit you have.


Tom’s Take

I’ve been on both sides of this fence before in a number of situations. Do we admit we have a known problem and try to get it fixed? Or do we get creative and try to hide it so we don’t have to own up to the uncomfortable questions that get asked about bad development or cutting corners? The answer should always be to own up to things. Make everyone aware of what’s going on and make it right. I’d rather deal with an honest company working hard to make things better than a dishonest vendor that miraculously manages to fix things out of nowhere. An ounce of honestly prevents a pound of bad reputation.

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