Sharing Failure as a Learning Model


Earlier this week there was a great tweet from my friends over at Juniper Networks about mistakes we’ve made in networking:

It got some interactions with the community, which is always nice, but it got me to thinking about how we solve problems and learn from our mistakes. I feel that we’ve reached a point where we’re learning from the things we’ve screwed up but we’re not passing it along like we used to.

Write It Down For the Future

Part of the reason why I started my blog was to capture ideas that had been floating in my head for a while. Troubleshooting steps or perhaps even ideas that I wanted to make sure I didn’t forget down the line. All of it was important to capture for the sake of posterity. After all, if you didn’t write it down did it even happen?

Along the way I found that the posts that got significant traction on my site were the ones that involved mistakes. Something I’d done that caused an issue or something I needed to look up through a lot of sources that I distilled down into an easy reference. These kinds of posts are the ones that fly right up to the top of the Google search results. They are how people know you. It could be a terminology post like defining trunks. Or perhaps it’s a question about why your SPF modules are working in a switch.

Once I realized that people loved finding posts that solved problems I made sure to write more of them down. If I found a weird error message I made sure to figure out what it was and then put it up for everyone to find. When I documented weird behaviors of BPDUGuard and BPDUFilter that didn’t match the documentation I wrote it all down, including how I’d made a mistake in the way that I interpreted things. It was just part of the experience for me. Documenting my failures and my learning process could help someone in the future. My hope was that someone in the future would find my post and learn from it like I had.

Chit Chat Channels

It used to be that when you Googled error messages you got lots of results from forum sites or Reddit or other blogs detailing what went wrong and how you fixed it. I assume that is because, just like me, people were doing their research and figuring out what went wrong and then documenting the process. Today I feel like a lot of that type of conversation is missing. I know it can’t have gone away permanently because all networking engineerings make mistakes and solve problems and someone has to know where that went, right?

The answer came to me when I read a Reddit post about networking message boards. The suggestions in the comments weren’t about places to go to learn more. Instead, they linked to Slack channels or Discord servers where people talk about networking. That answer made me realize why the discourse around problem solving and learning from mistakes seems to have vanished.

Slack and Discord are great tools for communication. They’re also very private. I’m not talking about gatekeeping or restrictions on joining. I’m talking about the fact that the conversations that happen there don’t get posted anywhere else. You can join, ask about a problem, get advice, try it, see it fail, try something else, and succeed all without ever documenting a thing. Once you solve the problem you don’t have a paper trail of all the things you tried that didn’t work. You just have the best solution that you did and that’s that.

You know what you can’t do with Slack and Discord? Search them through Google. The logs are private. The free tiers remove messages after a fashion. All that knowledge disappears into thin air. Unlike the Wisdom of the Ancients the issues we solve in Slack are gone as soon as you hit your message limit. No one learns from the mistakes because it looks like no one has made them before.

Going the Extra Mile

I’m not advocating for removing Slack and Discord from our daily conversations. Instead, I’m proposing that when we do solve a hard problem or we make a mistake that others might learn from we say something about it somewhere that people can find it. It could be a blog post or a Reddit thread or some kind of indexable site somewhere.

Even the process of taking what you’ve done and consolidating it down into something that makes sense can be helpful. I saw X, tried Y and Z, and ended up doing B because it worked the best of all. Just the process of how you got to B through the other things that didn’t work will go a long way to help others. Yes, it can be a bit humbling and embarrassing to publish something that admits you that you made a mistake. But It’s also part of the way that we learn as humans. If others can see where we went and understand why that path doesn’t lead to a solution then we’ve effectively taught others too.


Tom’s Take

It may be a bit self-serving for me to say that more people need to be blogging about solutions and problems and such, but I feel that we don’t really learn from it unless we internalize it. That means figuring it out and writing it down. Whether it’s a discussion on a podcast or a back-and-forth conversation in Discord we need to find ways to getting the words out into the world so that others can build on what we’ve accomplished. Google can’t search archives that aren’t on the web. If we want to leave a legacy for the DenverCoder10s of the future that means we do the work now of sharing our failures as well as our successes and letting the next generation learn from us.

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