Fast Friday Thoughts From Security Field Day


It’s a busy week for me thanks to Security Field Day but I didn’t want to leave you without some thoughts that have popped up this week from the discussions we’ve been having. Security is one of those topics that creates a lot of thought-provoking ideas and makes you seriously wonder if you’re doing it right all the time.

  • Never underestimate the value of having plumbing that connects all your systems. You may look at a solution and think to yourself “All this does is aggregate data from other sources”. Which raises the question: How do you do it now? Sure, antivirus fires alerts like a car alarm. But when you get breached and find out that those alerts caught it weeks ago you’re going to wish you had a better idea of what was going on. You need a way to send that data somewhere to be dealt with and cataloged properly. This is one of the biggest reasons why machine learning is being applied to the massive amount of data we gather in security. Having an algorithm working to find the important pieces means you don’t miss things that are important to you.
  • Not every solution is going to solve every problem you have. My dishwasher does a horrible job of washing my clothes or vacuuming my carpets. Is it the fault of the dishwasher? Or is it my issue with defining the problem? We need to scope our issues and our solutions appropriately. Just because my kitchen knives can open a package in a pinch doesn’t mean that the makers need to include package-opening features in a future release because I use them exclusively for that purpose. Once we start wanting the vendors to build a one-stop-shop kind of solution we’re going to create the kind of technical debt that we need to avoid. We also need to remember to scope problems so that they’re solvable. Postulating that there are corner cases with no clear answers are important for threat hunting or policy creation. Not so great when shopping through a catalog of software.
  • Every term in every industry is going to have a different definition based on who is using it. A knife to me is either a tool used on a campout or a tool used in a kitchen. Others see a knife as a tool for spreading butter or even doing surgery. It’s a matter of perspective. You need to make sure people know the perspective you’re coming from before you decide that the tool isn’t going to work properly. I try my best to put myself in the shoes of others when I’m evaluating solutions or use cases. Just because I don’t use something in a certain way doesn’t mean it can’t be used that way. And my environment is different from everyone else’s. Which means best practices are really just recommended suggestions.
  • Whatever acronym you’ve tied yourself to this week is going to change next week because there’s a new definition of what you should be doing according to some expert out there. Don’t build your practice on whatever is hot in the market. Build it on what you need to accomplish and incorporate elements of new things into what you’re doing. The story of people ripping and replacing working platforms because of an analyst suggestion sounds horrible but happens more often than we’d like to admit. Trust your people, not the brochures.

Tom’s Take

Security changes faster than any area that I’ve seen. Cloud is practically a glacier compare to EPP, XDR, and SOPV. I could even make up an acronym and throw it on that list and you might not even notice. You have to stay current but you also have to trust that you’re doing all you can. Breaches are going to happen no matter what you do. You have to hope you’ve done your best and that you can contain the damage. Remember that good security comes from asking the right questions instead of just plugging tools into the mix to solve issues you don’t have.

1 thought on “Fast Friday Thoughts From Security Field Day

  1. Pingback: Fast Friday Thoughts From Security Field Day - Tech Field Day

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