DevOps is a Silo

Silos are bad. We keep hearing how IT is too tribal and broken up into teams that only care about their swim lanes. The storage team doesn’t care about the network. The server teams don’t care about the storage team. The network team is a bunch of jerks that don’t like anyone. It’s a viscous cycle of mistrust and playground cliques.

Except for DevOps. The savior has finally arrived! DevOps is the silo-busting mentality that will allow us all to get with the program and get everything done right this time. The DevOps mentality doesn’t reinforce teams or silos. It focuses on the only pure thing left in the world – committing code. The way of the CI/CD warrior. But what if I told you that DevOps was just another silo?

Team Players

Before the pitchforks and torches come out, let’s examine why IT has been so tribal for so long. The silo mentality came about when we started getting more specialized with regards to infrastructure. Think about the original compute resources – mainframes. There weren’t any silos with mainframes because everyone pretty much had to know what they were doing with every part of the system. Everything was connected to the mainframe. The mainframe itself was the silo.

When we busted the mainframe apart and started down the road of client/server computing the hardware started becoming more specialized. Instead of one giant machine we had lots of little special machines everywhere. The more we deconstructed the mainframe, the more we needed to focus. The direct-attached storage became NAS and eventually SAN. The computer got bigger and bigger and eventually morphed into a virtualized hypervisor. The network exists to connect everything to the rest of the world, and as technology wore on the network became the transport for the infrastructure to talk to everything else.

Silos exist because you had to have specialized knowledge to operate your specialized infrastructure. Sure, there could be some cross training at lower levels or administration. Buy one you got into really complex topics like disk geometry optimization or route redistribution the ability for a layperson to understand what was going on was shot. Each silo exists to reinforce their own infrastructure. Each silo has their norms and their schedules. The storage team will never lose data. The network always has to be available.

Even as these silos got crammed together and subsumed into new job roles, the ideas behind them stayed consistent. Some of the storage admin’s job roles combined with the virtualization team to be some kind of a hybrid. The networking team has been pushed to adopt more agile development methodologies like automation and orchestration. Through it all, the silos were coming down as people pushed the teams to embrace more software focused on the infrastructure. That is, until DevOps burst onto the scene.

OpSilo

The DevOps tribe has a mantra: “Move Fast. Break Things. Ship. Ship. SHIP!” Maybe not those exact words but something very similar. DevOps didn’t come from mainframes. It didn’t even come from the early days of client/server. DevOps grew out of a time when everything was blown apart and on the verge of being moved into the cloud. These new DevOperators didn’t think about infrastructure as a team or a tribe. Instead, it was an impediment to shipping code.

When you work in software, moving fast and breaking things works. Because you’re pushing the limits of what you can do. You’re focused on features. You want new shiny things. Stability can wait as long as the next code commit is right around the corner. Who cares about what you’ve been doing.

In order to have the best experience with Software X, please turn on Automatic Updates so we can push the code as fast as our commits will allow.

Sound familiar? Who cares about disk geometry or route reflectors. Make my stuff work! Your infrastructure supports all my awesome code. I write the stuff that pays your salary. This place would be out of business if it wasn’t for me!

Granted that’s a little extreme, but the mentality is the same. Infrastructure exists to be consumed. IT is there to support the mission of Moving Fast, Breaking Things, and Shipping. It’s almost like a tribal behavior. Everyone has the same objective – ALL THE COMMITS!

Move fast and break things is the exact opposite of the storage and networking teams. You really don’t want to be screaming along at 800Mph when deploying a new SAN or trying to get iBGP stood up. You want careful. Calm. Collected. You’re working with a whole system that’s built on a house of cards. Unlike DevOps, breaking a thing in a SAN or on the edge of a network could impact the entire system, not just one chat module.

That’s why Networking and storage admins are so methodical. I harken back to some of my days in network engineering. When the network was running slow or the storage array was taxed, it took time to get data back. People were irritated but they got used to the idea of slowness. But if those systems ever went down, it was all-hands-on-deck panic! Contrast that with the mentality of the DevOps tribe. Who cares if it’s kind of broken right now? We need to ship the next feature or patch.

DevOps isn’t a silo buster. It’s just a different kind of tribal silo. The DevOps folks all have similar mentalities and view infrastructure in the same way. Cloud appeals to them because it minimizes infrastructure and gives them the tools they need to focus on developing. Cloud sprawl can easily happen when planning doesn’t occur. When specialized groups get together and talk about what they need, there is a reduction in consumed resources. Storage admins know how to get the most out of what they have. They don’t just spin up another bucket and keep deploying.


Tom’s Take

If you treat DevOps like a siloed tribe you’ll find their behavior is much easier to predict and work with. Don’t look at them as a cross-functional solution to all your problems. Even if you deploy all your assets to the cloud you’re going to need specialized teams to manage them once the infrastructure grows too big to manage by movement. Specialization isn’t the result of bad planning or tribalism. Instead, those specialized teams developed because of the need for deeper understanding. Just like DevOps developed out of a need to understand rapid deployment and fast-moving consumption of infrastructure. In time, the next “solution” to the DevOps problem will come along and we’ll find as well that it’s just another siloed team.

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