Is Patching And Tech Support Bad? A Response


Hopefully, you’ve had a chance to watch this 7 minute video from Greg Ferro about why better patching systems can lead to insecure software. If you haven’t, you should:

Greg is right that moral hazard is introduced because, by definition, the party providing the software is “insured” against the risks of the party using the software. But, I also have a couple of issues with some of the things he said about tech support.

Are You Ready For The Enterprise

I’ve been working with some Ubiquiti access points recently. So far, I really enjoy them and I’m interested to see where their product is going. After doing some research, the most common issue with them seems to be their tech support offerings. A couple of Reddit users even posted in a thread that the lack of true enterprise tech support is the key that is keeping Ubiquiti from reaching real enterprise status.

Think about all the products that you’ve used over the last couple of years that offered some other kind of support aside from phone or rapid response. Maybe it was a chat window on the site. Maybe it was an asynchronous email system. Hell, if you’ve ever installed Linux in the past on your own you know the joys of heading to Google to research an issue and start digging into post after post on a long-abandoned discussion forum. DenverCoder9 would agree.

By Greg’s definition, tech support creates negative incentive to ship good code because the support personnel are there to pick up the pieces for all your mistakes when writing code. It even incentivizes people to set unrealistic goals and push code out the door to hit milestones. On the flip side, try telling people your software is so good that you don’t need tech support. It will run great on anything every time and never mess up once. If you don’t get laughed out of the building you should be in sales.

IT professionals are conditioned to need tech support. Even if they never call the number once they’re going to want the option. In the VAR world, this is the “throat to choke” mentality. When the CEO is coming down to find out why the network is down or his applications aren’t working, they are usually not interested in the solution. They want to yell at someone to feel like they’ve managed the problem. Likewise, tech support exists to find the cause of the problem in the long run. But it’s also a safety blanket that exists for IT professionals to have someone to yell at after the CEO gets to them. Tech Support is necessary. Not because of buggy code, but because of peace of mind.

How Complex Are You?

Greg’s other negative aspect to tech support is that it encourages companies to create solutions more complex than they need to be because someone will always be there to help you through them. Having done nationwide tech support for a long time, I can tell you that most of the time that complexity is there for a reason. Either you hide it behind a pretty veneer or you risk having people tell you that your product is “too simple”.

A good example case here is Meraki. Meraki is a well-known SMB/SME networking solution. Many businesses run on Meraki and do it well. Consultants sell Meraki by the boatload. You know who doesn’t like Meraki? Tinkerers. People that like to understand systems. The people that stay logged into configuration dashboards all day long.

Meraki made the decision when they started building their solution that they weren’t going to have a way to expose advanced functionality in the system to the tinkerers. They either buried it and set it to do the job it was designed to do or they left it out completely. That works for the majority of their customer base. But for those that feel they need to be in more control of the solution, it doesn’t work at all. Try proposing a Meraki solution to a group of die-hard traditionalist IT professionals in a large enterprise scenario. Odds are good you’re going to get slammed and then shown out of the building.

I too have my issues with Meraki and their ability to be a large enterprise solution. It comes down to choosing to leave out features for the sake of simplicity. When I was testing my Ubiquiti solution, I quickly found the Advanced Configuration setting and enabled it. I knew I would never need to touch any of those things, yet it made me feel more comfortable knowing I could if I needed to.

Making a solution overly complex isn’t a design decision. Sometimes the technology dictates that the solution needs to be complex. Yet, we knock solutions that require more than 5 minutes to deploy. We laud companies that hide complexity and claim their solutions are simple and easy. And when they all break we get angry because, as tinkerers, we can’t go in and do our best to fix them.


Tom’s Take

In a world where software in king, quality matters. But, so does speed and reaction. You can either have a robust patching system that gives you the ability to find and repair unforeseen bugs quickly or you can have what I call the “Blizzard Model”. Blizzard is a gaming company that has been infamous for shipping things “when they’re done” and not a moment before. If that means a project is 2-3 years late then so be it. But, when you’re a game company and this is your line of work you want it to be perfect out of the box and you’re willing to forego revenue to get it right. When you’re a software company that is expected to introduce new features on a regular cadence and keep the customers happy it’s a bit more difficult.

Perhaps creating a patching system incentivizes people to do bad things. Or, perhaps it incentivizes them to try new things and figure out new ideas without the fear that one misstep will doom the product. I guess it comes down to whether or not you believe that people are inherently going to game the system or not.

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2 thoughts on “Is Patching And Tech Support Bad? A Response

  1. Truly, tech support is needed. The moral hazard is introduced by the fact that tech support is being paid for which incentivizes bar products.

    My ideal vendor would say “you can get tech support, it’s free”. THAT would be an incentive to make good products.

  2. Pingback: Is Patching And Tech Support Bad? A Response - Codango™

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