Time For Improvement

Welcome to 2020! First and foremost, no posts from me involving vision or eyesight or any other optometrist puns for this year. I promise 366 days free of anything having to do with eyeballs. That does mean a whole world of other puns that I’m going to be focusing on!

Now, let’s look back at 2019. The word that I could use to describe it was “hectic”. It felt like everything was in overdrive all year long. There were several times that I got to the end of the week and realized that I didn’t have any kind of post ready to go. I’m the kind of person that likes to write when the inspiration hits me. And instead I found myself scrambling to write up some thoughts. And that was something I told myself that I was going to get away from. So we’re going to call that one a miss and get back to trying to post on a day other than Friday.

That also means that, given all the other content that I’ve been working on with Gestalt IT that I’m going to have to schedule some time actually working on that content instead of hoping that some idea is going to fly out of the blue at 11:30pm the night before I’m supposed to put a post up. The good news is that also means that I’m going to be upping the amount of content that I’m consuming for inspiration. Since I spent a good chunk of they year going on a morning walk it meant that I had a lot more time to consume podcast episodes and wash those ideas around. I’m sure that means that I’m going to find the time and the motivation to keep turning out content.

Part of the reason for that is because of something that Stephen Foskett (@SFoskett) told me during a call this past year. He said that I’ve been consistently turning out content for the last 9 years on a weekly basis. I’m proud of that fact. Sure, there’s been a couple of times in the last year or two when I’ve missed and had to publish something on a Saturday or the Monday after. But overall I’m happy with the amount of content that I’ve been writing here. And because you all keep on reading it I’m going to keep writing it. There’s a lot of value in what I do here and I hope you all continue to value it too.

IA Writing

Last January I switched over to using IA Writer for my posts on my iPad. I wrote primarily on that platform all year long. I can say that It’s very handy to be able to grab your mobile device and hammer out a post. Given that I can do split screen and reference my hand-written notes from briefings it’s a huge advantage to keeping my thoughts organized and ready to put down on paper.

Between IA Writer for writing, Notability for taking notes during briefings, and Things to keep me on track for the posts that I need to cover I’ve gotten my workflow down to something that works for me. I’m going to keep tweaking it for sure but I’m happy that I can get information to a place where I can refer to it later and have reminders about what I need to cover. It makes everything seamless and consistent. There are still some things that I need to use Microsoft Word to write, but those are long-form projects. Overall, I’m going to keep refining my process to make it better and more appropriate for me.

Ultimately, that’s a big goal for me in 2020 and something that I’ve finally realized that I do regularly without conscious thought. If you’ve read any books on process or project management you’ve probably heard of kaizen, the Japanese concept of continuous improvement of processes. It’s something that drives companies like Toyota to get better at everything they do and never accept anything as “complete”.

I’ve read about kaizen before but I never really understood that it could mean any improvement before. I had it in my head that the process was about change all the time. It wasn’t until I sat down this year and analyzed what I was doing to find that I’m always trying to optimize what I do. It’s not about finding shortcuts for the sake of saving time. It’s about optimizing what I do to save effort and the investment of time. For me it’s not about spending 8 hours to write a script that will automate a one-time 30-minute task. It’s about breaking down the task and figuring out how many times I’ll do it and how I need to optimize the process to spend less time on it. If the answer is a script or an automation routine then I’m all for it. But the key is recognizing the kaizen process and putting a name to my behavior.


Tom’s Take

2020 is going to be busy. Tech Field Day is going to be busy. I’m going to be at a lot of events checking out what’s going on and how to make new things happen. I’m also going to be writing a lot. And when you factor in my roles outside of work with Wood Badge and a trip to Philmont, NM with my son for a high adventure trip with his scout troop you can see I’m going to be quite occupied even when I’m not writing. But I’m not going to remove anything from my process. As I said above, I’m going to kaizen everything and fit it all in. That might mean having a couple of posts queued up when I’m in the back country or taking some extra time after dinner to write. But 2020 is going to be a big year of optimizing my workflows and improving in every way.

Stop SIS – Self-Inflicted Spam

Last month I ran across a great blog post by Jed Casey (@WaxTrax) about letting go of the digital hoard that he had slowly been collecting over the years. It’s not easy to declare bankruptcy because you’ve hit your limit of things that you can learn and process. Jed’s focus in the article is that whatever he was going to try and come up with was probably out of date or past its prime. But it got me to thinking about a little project that I’ve been working on over the past few months.

Incoming!

One of the easy ways to stay on top of things in the industry is to sign up for updates. A digest email here and a notification there about new posts or conversations is a great way to stay in-the-know about information or the latest, greatest thing. But before you know it you’re going to find yourself swamped with incoming emails and notifications.

I’ve noticed it quite a bit in my inbox this year. What was once a message that I would read to catch up became a message I would scan for content. That then became a message that I skipped past after I read the subject line and eventually settled into something I deleted after seeing the sender. It’s not that the information contained within wasn’t important in some way. Instead, my processing capability for the email or the message was settled into a mode where it took a lot to break me out of the pattern. Before I knew it, I was deleting dozens of messages a day simply because they were updates and digests that I didn’t have the time or mental capacity to process.

That’s when I realized that I had a problem. I needed to reduce the amount of email I was getting. But this wasn’t an issue like normal spam. Unsolicited Bulk Email is a huge issue for the Internet but the systems we have in place now do a good job of stopping it before it lands in my inbox. Instead, my bigger issue was with the tide of email that I had specifically chosen to sign up for. The newsletters and release updates and breaking news that was flooding my email client and competing for my attention on an hourly basis. It was too much.

Geronimo!

So what did I do?

  1. The first thing I did was stop. I stopped signing up for every newsletter and notification that interested me. Instead, I added them all to a list and let them sit for a week. If they still appealed to me after that week than I would sign up for them. Otherwise, then went into the garbage pile before I ever had a chance to start getting inundated by them.
  2. The next thing was to unsubscribe from every email that I got that was deleted without reading. Sure, I could just keep deleting them. But that process still took my attention away from what I needed to be working on. Instead, i wanted to stop that at the source. Keeping it from being sent in the first place might only save two seconds from it being deleted out of my inbox, but those two seconds per email can really add up.
  3. Summaries are your friend. For every email I did actually read, I looked to see if there was a summary or digest option instead of constant updates. Did I really need to know instantly when someone had posted or replied? Nope. But figuring it out on a more set schedule, such as every other day or once a week, was a big improvement in the way that I could process information. I could dedicate time to reading a longer digest instead of scanning an notification that quickly blurred into the background.
  4. I turned off instant updates on my mail client for a time. I didn’t need to jump every time something came in. Instead, I set my client to update every 15 minutes. I knew there would be some kind of lag in my replies in a lot of cases, but it honestly wasn’t that different from before. What changed here is that I could deal with the bulk amount of email all at once instead of trying to process them one at a time as they arrived. And, ironically enough, the amount of time it took to deal with email went down significantly as I reduced the amount of email coming in. Instead, I was able to set my mail client back to instant updates and keep a better pace of getting to the important emails as they came in.

Once I went through this process I was able to reduce the amount of email that I was getting blasted with. And being able to keep my head above water helped me process the stuff that did end up coming in later that I needed to stop. The mailing lists that you get subscribed to out of nowhere. The vendor press release schedules that I needed to categorize and process. Having the ability to catch my breath helped immensely. Once I realized that I was the cause for my spam issues I was able to make headway.


Tom’s Take

Don’t do what I did. Don’t let yourself get to the point where I was. Your inbox isn’t a garbage pile for every random email or update. Don’t sign up for stuff you aren’t planning on reading. Audit your newsletters frequently to see how much you’re reading them. If you find yourself deleting stuff without ever opening it then you know you’ve reached a point where you need to stop and reassess what you’re trying to accomplish. If you aren’t even bothering to open things then you aren’t really staying on top of the game. Instead, focus your attention on making sure you have the attention span left to look at things. And stop inflicting spam on yourself.

The Blogging Mirror

Writing isn’t always the easiest thing in the world to do. Coming up with topics is hard, but so too is making those topics into a blog post. I find myself getting briefings on a variety of subjects all the time, especially when it comes to networking. But translating those briefings into blog posts isn’t always straight forward. When I find myself stuck and ready to throw in the towel I find it easy to think about things backwards.

A World Of Pure Imagination

When people plan blog posts, they often think about things in a top-down manner. They come up with a catchy title, then an amusing anecdote to open the post. Then they hit the main idea, find a couple of supporting arguments, and then finally they write a conclusion that ties it all together. Sound like a winning formula?

Except when it isn’t. How about when the title doesn’t reflect the content of the post? Or the anecdote or lead in doesn’t quite fit with the overall tone? How about when the blog starts meandering away from the main idea halfway through with a totally separate argument? Or when the conclusion is actually the place where the lede is buried like the Ark of the Covenant?

All of these things are artifacts of the creative process. We often brainstorm great ideas halfway through the process and it derails our train of thought. That leads us down tangents we never intended to go down and create posts that aren’t thematic or even readable in some cases.

It happens all the time. In fact, even in writing this post I thought of a catchy title for a subject heading and had to move it when I was done because the heading didn’t fit the content of the section that followed. It’s okay to have the freedom to change that as soon as you see it. Provided you have a plan for the rest of the post. And that’s where the key here comes into play.

Strike That, Reverse It

I find the easiest way to plan a blog post is to actually write it in reverse. Instead of thinking about things from a top-down method, I start off by thinking about thinks bottom up. Literally.

  • Start From The End – It’s easiest to write the conclusion of your post first. After all, you’re just restating what you’ve been arguing or demonstrating in the post, right? So start with that. Use it as the main idea of your writing. Always refer back to it. If what you’ve typed doesn’t fit the tone of the conclusion, you either need to support it or cut it.
  • Support Your Conclusion – Now that you know what you’re going to be talking about, figure out how to support it. that means figuring out how to break your argument in to paragraphs and logical sections. Note that even though you’re trying to optimize for reading on screens today, you still need to follow basic structure. Paragraphs have multiple sentences that support the main idea. One you have two or three of those arguments, you’ve got support for your conclusion.
  • State The Topic – After you build your support for your conclusion then you can write the topic. After all, you just spent a lot of time spelling it all out. This paragraph at the top is where you state the purpose or theme of the post. Don’t worry about getting into too much detail here. That’s what the support is for. Your readers will get the idea by the time they get to the conclusion, which serves to wrap it all together.
  • Build Your Anecdote – If you are the type of writer that likes to open with an anecdote, much like a cold open in a drama, this is where you write it. Now that you’ve basically outlined the whole post you can tie your anecdote into the rest of the narrative. You don’t have to worry about building your discussion to support the really cool story. Because you’re adding the story at the end of the creative process you can guarantee that it’s going to fit.
  • Title Card – Now that you’ve written the post you can title it. This keeps you from making a title that doesn’t fit the narrative. It also allows the title to make a bit more sense in context. Either because you called the post something cute and catchy or because you made the most SEO optimized title in history to reap those sweet, sweet Google searches.

Tom’s Take

As you can see, posts are easier to write in reverse. When you think about things the opposite way from the restrictive methods of writing you’re much more free to express your creativity while also keeping yourself on track to make sure everything makes sense. Some people thrive in the realm of structure and can easily crank out a post from the top down. But when you find yourself stuck because you can’t tie everything together the right way try looking in a blogging mirror. The results will end up the same, but backwards might just be the way forward.

2019 Is The King of Content

2018 was a year full of excitement and fun. And for me, it was a year full of writing quite a bit. Not only did keep up my writing here for my audience but I also wrote quite a few posts for GestaltIT.com. You can find a list of all the stuff I wrote right here. I took a lot of briefings from up-and-coming companies as well as talking to some other great companies and writing a couple of series about SD-WAN.

It was also a big year for the Gestalt IT Rundown. My co-host with most Rich Stroffolino (@MrAnthropology) and I had a lot of fun looking at news from enterprise IT and some other fun chipset and cryptocurrency news. And I’ve probably burned my last few bridges with Larry Ellison and Mark Zuckerberg to boot. I look forward to recording these episodes every Wednesday and I hope that some of you will join us on the Gestalt IT Facebook page at 12:30 EST as well.

Content Coming Your Way

So, what does that leave in store for 2019? Well, since I hate predictions on an industry scale, that means taking a look at what I plan on doing for the next year. For the coming 365 days, that means creating a lot of content for sure. You already know that I’m going to be busy with a variety of fun things like Networking Field Day, Mobility Field Day, and Security Field Day. That’s in addition to all the things that I’m going to be doing with Tech Field Day Extra at Cisco Live Europe and Cisco Live US in San Diego.

I’m also going to keep writing both here and at Gestalt IT. You probably saw my post last week about how hard it is to hit your deadlines. Well, it’s going to be a lot of writing coming out in both places thanks to coverage of briefings that I’m taking about industry companies as well as a few think pieces about bigger trends going on in the industry.

I’m also going to experiment more with video. One of the inspirations that I’m looking at is none other than my good friend Ethan Banks (@ECBanks). He’s had some amazing videos series that he’s been cranking out on his daily walks. He’s been collecting some of them in the Brain Spasms playlist. It’s a really good listen and he’s tackling some fun topics so far. I think I’m going to try my hand at some solo video content in the future at Gestalt IT. This blog is going to stay written for the time being.

Creating Content Quickly

One of the other things that I’m playing around with is the idea of being able to create content much more quickly and on the spot versus sitting down for long form discussions. You may recall from a post in 2015 that I’ve embraced using Markdown. I’ve been writing pretty consistently in Markdown for the past three years and it’s become second nature to me. That’s a good thing for sure. But for 2019, I’m going to branch out a bit.

The biggest change is that I’m going to try to do the majority of my writing on an iPad instead of my laptop. This means that I can just grab a tablet and type out some words quickly. It also means that I can take notes on my iPad and then immediately translate them into thoughts and words. I’m going to do this using iA Writer as my content creation tool. It’s going to help me with my Markdown as well as helping me keep all the content I’m going to write organized. I’m going to force myself to use this new combination unless there’s no way I can pull it off, such as with my Cisco Live Twitter list. That whole process still relies quite a bit on code and not on Markdown.

As I mentioned in my deadline post, I’m also going to try to move my posting dates back from Friday to Wednesday or Thursday at the latest. That gives me some time to play around with ideas and still have a cushion before I’m late with a post. On the big days I may still have an extra post here or there to talk about some big news that’s breaking. I’m hoping this allows me to get some great content out there and keep the creative juices flowing.


Tom’s Take

2019 is going to be a full year. But it allows me to concentrate on the things that I love and am really good at doing: Writing and leading Tech Field Day. Maybe branching out into video is going to give me a new avenue as well, but for now that’s going to stay pretty secondary to the writing aspect of things. I really hope that having a more mobile writing studio also helps me get my thoughts down quickly and create some more compelling posts in the coming year. Here’s hoping it all works out and I’ve got some great things to look back on in 365 days!

 

Meeting Your Deadlines Is Never Easy

2018 has been a busy year. There’s been a lot going on in the networking world and the pace of things keeps accelerating. I’ve been inundated with things this last month, including endless requests for my 2019 predictions and where I think the market is going. Since I’m not a prediction kind of person, I wanted to take just a couple of moments to talk more about something that I did find interesting from 2018 – deadlines.

Getting It Out The Door

Long-time readers of this blog may remember that I’ve always had a goal set for myself of trying to get one post published every week. It’s a deadline I set for myself to make sure that I didn’t let my blog start decaying into something that is barely updated. I try to hold fast to my word and get something new out every week. Sometimes it’s simple, like reflections on one of the various Tech Field Day events that I’m working on that week. But there’s always something.

That is, until Cisco Live this year. I somehow got so wrapped up in things that I missed a post for the first time in eight years! Granted, this was the collection of several things going on at once:

  1. I was running Tech Field Day Extra during Cisco Live. So I was working my tail off the entire time.
  2. I was at Cisco Live, which is always a hugely busy time for me. Even when I’m not doing something specific to the event it’s social hour every hour.
  3. I normally write posts on Thursday afternoon to publish Friday this year. Guess what happened on Thursday at Cisco Live after we all said goodbye? I went on vacation with my family to Disney World. So I kind of forgot that I didn’t publish anything until Sunday afternoon.

The perfect confluence of factors led to me missing a deadline. Now, I’ve missed it again once more this year and totally forgotten to write something until the Monday following my deadline. And it’s even more frustrating when it’s something I totally could have controlled but didn’t.

Why the fuss? I mean, it’s not like all my readers are going to magically run away if I don’t put something out today or tomorrow. While that is very true, it’s more for me that I don’t want to forget to put content out. More than any other thing, scheduling your content is the key to keeping your readers around.

Think about network television. For years, they advertised their timeslots as much as they advertised their shows. Must-See Thursday. TGIF. Each of these may conjure images of friendly shows or of full houses. But you remember the day as much as you remember the shows, right? That’s because the schedule became important. If you don’t think that matters, imagine the shows that are up against big events or keep getting bumped because of sporting events. There’s a reason why Sunday evening isn’t a good time for a television show. Or why no one tries to put something up against the Super Bowl.

Likewise, schedules are important for blogging. I used to just hit publish on my posts whenever I finished them. That meant sending them out at 9pm on a Tuesday some times. Not the best time for people to want to dive into a technical post. Instead, I started publishing them in the mornings after I wrote them. That means more eyeballs and more time to have people reflect on them. I’ve always played around with the daily schedule of when to publish, but in 2018 it got pushed to Friday out of necessity. I kept running out of time. Instead of focusing on the writing, I would often wake up Friday morning with writer’s block and just churn something out to hit my deadline.

Writing because you have to is not fun. Wracking your brain to come up with some topic of conversation is stressful. Lee Badman has been posting questions every weekday morning to the wireless community for a long while and he’s decided that it’s run its course. I applaud Lee for stepping away from something like that before it became a chore. It’s not easy to leave something behind that has meant a lot to you.

Write Like The Wind

For me, blogging is still fun. I still very much enjoy sitting down in front of a computer keyboard and getting some great thoughts out there. I find my time at Tech Field Day events has energized my writing to a large degree because there is so much good content out there that needs to be discussed and indexed. I still enjoy pouring my thoughts out onto a piece of digital paper for everyone to read.

Could I cut back to simple reaction posts? Sure. But that’s not my style. I started blogging because I like the long-form of text. I’ve written some quick sub-500 word pieces because I needed to get something out. But those are the exceptions to the rule. I’d rather keep things thoughtful and encourage people to spend more time focusing on words.

I think the biggest thing that I need to change in the posting dates. I need to move back from Friday to give myself some headroom to post. I also need to use Friday as my last-ditch day to get things published. That may mean putting more thought to my posts earlier in the week for sure. It may also mean having two posts on weeks that big news breaks. But that’s the life of a writer, isn’t it?

Home Away From Home

The third biggest challenge for deadlines is all the other writing that I’m doing. I spend a lot of time taking briefings and such for Gestalt IT, which I affectionately refer to as my “Bruce Wayne” job. I get to hear a lot of fun stories and see a lot of great companies just starting out in the world. I write a lot over there because it’s how I keep up with the industry. Remember that year that I went crazy and wrote two posts every week for an entire year? Yeah, good times. Guess what? It’s going to be like that again!

Gestalt IT is going to be my writing source for most of my briefings and coverage of companies. It’s going to have a much different tone that this blog does. Here is when I’m going to spend more time pontificating and looking at big trends in technology. Or perhaps it will be stirring the pot. But I still plan on getting out one post a week about some topic. And I won’t be posting it on Friday unless I absolutely have to.


Tom’s Take

It’s no stretch to say that writing is something I do better than anything else. It’s also something I love to do. I want to do my best to keep bringing good content to everyone out there that likes to read my blog. I’m going to spend some time exploring new workflows and trying to keep the hits coming along as 2019 rolls around. I’ll have more to say on that in my usual January 1 post to kick off the new year!

Writing Is Hard

Writing isn’t the easiest thing in the world to do. There are a lot of times that people sit down to pour out their thoughts onto virtual paper and nothing happens. Or they spend hours and hours researching a topic only to put something together that falls apart because of assumptions about a key point that aren’t true.

The world is becoming more and more enamored with other forms of media. We like listening to podcasts instead of reading. We prefer short videos instead of long articles. Visual aids beat a wall of text any day. Even though each of these content types has a script it still feels better having a conversation. Informal chat beats formal prose every day.

Written Wringers

I got into blogging because my typing fingers are way more eloquent than the thoughts running through my brain. I had tons of ideas that I needed to put down on paper and the best way to do that was to build a simple blog and get to it. It’s been eight years of posting and I still feel like I have a ton to say. But it’s not easy to make the words flow all the time.

I find that my blogging issues boil down into two categories. The first is when there is nothing to write about. That’s how most people feel. They see the same problems over and over and there’s nothing to really discuss. The second issue is when a topic has been absolutely beaten to a pulp. SD-WAN is a great example. I’ve written a lot about SD-WAN in a bunch of places. And as exciting as the technology is for people implementing it for the first time, I feel like I’ve said everything there is to say about SD-WAN. I know that because it feels like the articles are all starting to sound the same.

There are some exciting new technologies on the horizon. 802.11ax is one of them. So too is the new crop of super fast Ethernet. We even have crazy stuff like silicon photonics and machine learning and AI invading everything we do. There’s a lot of great stuff just a little ways out there. But it’s all going to take research and time. And learning. And investment. And that takes time to suss everything out. Which means a lot of fodder for blog posts as people go through the learning process.

Paper Trail

The reason why blogging is still so exciting for me is because of all the searches that I get that land in my neighborhood. Thinks like fixing missing SFPs or sending calls directly to voicemail. These are real problems that people have that need to be solved.

As great as podcasts and video series are, they aren’t searchable. Sure, the show notes can be posted that discuss some of the topics in general. But those show notes are basically a blog post without prose. They’re a bullet point list of reference material and discussion points. That’s where blogs are still very important. They are the sum total of knowledge that we have in a form that people can see.

If you look at Egyptian hieroglyphs or even Ancient Greek writings you can see what their society is like. You get a feel for who they were. And you can read it because it was preserved over time. The daily conversations didn’t stand the test of time unless they were committed to memory somehow. Sure, podcasts and videos are a version of this as well, but they’re also very difficult to maintain.

Think back to all the video that you have that was recorded before YouTube existed. Think about all the recordings that exist on VHS, Super8, or even reel-to-reel tape. One of the biggest achievements of humanity was the manned landing on the moon in 1969. Now, just 50 years later we don’t have access to the video records of that landing. A few grainy copies of the records exist, but not the original media. However, the newspaper articles are still preserved in both printed and archive form. And those archives are searchable for all manner of information.


Tom’s Take

Written words are important. Because they will outlast us. As much as we’d like to believe that our videos are going to be our breakthrough and those funny podcasts are going to live forever, the truth is that people are going to forget our voices and faces long after we’re gone. Our words will live forever though. Because of archiving and searchability future generations will be able to read our thoughts just like we read those of philosophers and thinkers from years past. But in order to do that, we have to write.

2018 Is The Year Of Writing Everything

Welcome back to a year divisible by 2! 2018 is going to be a good year through the power of positive thinking. It’s going to be a fun year for everyone. And I’m going to do my best to have fun in 2018 as well.

Per my tradition, today is a day to look at what is going to be coming in 2018. I don’t make predictions, even if I take some shots at people that do. I also try not to look back to heavily on the things I’ve done over the past year. Google and blog searches are your friend there. Likely as not, you’ve read what I wrote this year and found one or two things useful, insightful, or amusing. What I want to do is set up what the next 52 weeks are going to look like for everyone that comes to this blog to find content.

Wearing Out The Keyboard

The past couple of years has shown me that the written word is starting to lose a bit of luster for content consumers. There’s been a bit push to video. Friends like Keith Townsend, Robb Boardman, and Rowell Dionicio have started making more video content to capture people’s eyes and ears. I myself have even noticed that I spend more time listening to 10-minute video recaps of things as opposed to reading 500-600 words on the subject.

I believe that my strengths lie in my writing. I’m going to continue to produce content around that here for the foreseeable future. But that’s not so say that I can’t dabble. With the help of my media-minded co-worker Rich Stroffolino, we’ve created a weekly video discussion called the Gestalt IT Rundown. It’s mostly what you would expect from a weekly video series. Rich and I find 2-3 tech news articles and make fun of them while imparting some knowledge and perspective. We’ve been having a blast recording them and we’re going to be bringing you more of them every Wednesday in 2018.

That’s not to say that my only forays on GestaltIT.com are going to be video focused. I’m also going to be writing more there as well. I’ve had some articles go up there this year that talked about some of the briefings that I’ve been taking from networking companies. That is going to continue through 2018 as well. I’ve also had some great long form writing, including my favorite article from last year about vendors and VARs. I’m going to continue to post articles on Gestalt IT in 2018 as well as posting them here. I’m going to need to figure out the right mix of what to put up for my day job and what to put up here for my Batman job. If there’s a kind of article you prefer to see here please make sure to let me know so I can find a way to make more of them.

Lastly, in 2018 I’m going to try some new things as well with regard to my writing. I’m going to write more coverage of the events I attend. Things like Cisco Live, WLPC, and other industry events will have some discussions of what goes on there for people that can’t go or are looking for the kind of information that you can’t get from an event website. I’m also going to try to find a way to incorporate some of my more detailed pieces together as reports for consumption. I’m not sure how this is going to happen, but I figured if I put it down here as a goal then I would be required to make it happen next year.


Tom’s Take

I like writing. I like teaching and informing and telling the occasional bad joke about BGP. It’s all because I get regular readers that want to hear what I have to say that I continue to do what I do. Rather than worry about the lack of content and coverage that I’m seeing in the community, I’ve decided to do my part to put out more. It is a challenging exercise to come up with new ideas every week and put them out for the world to see. But as long as folks like you keep reading what I have to say I’ll keep writing it all down.