Will Dell Networking Wither Away?

chopping-block-Dell-EMC

The behemoth merger of Dell and EMC is nearing conclusion. The first week of August is the target date for the final wrap up of all the financial and legal parts of the acquisition. After that is done, the long task of analyzing product lines and finding a way to reduce complexity and product sprawl begins. We’ve already seen the spin out of Quest and Sonicwall into a separate entity to raise cash for the final stretch of the acquisition. No doubt other storage and compute products are going to face a go/no go decision in the future. But one product line which is in real danger of disappearing is networking.

Whither Whitebox?

The first indicator of the problems with Dell and networking comes from whitebox switching. Dell released OS 10 earlier this year as a way to capitalize on the growing market of free operating systems running on commodity hardware. Right now, OS 10 can run on Dell equipment. In the future, they are hoping to spread it out to whitebox devices. That assumes that soon you’ll see Dell branded OSes running on switches purchased from non-Dell sources booting with ONIE.

Once OS 10 pushes forward, what does that mean for Dell’s hardware business? Dell would naturally want to keep selling devices to customers. Whitebox switches would undercut their ability to offer cheap ports to customers in data center deployments. Rather than give up that opportunity, Dell is positioning themselves to run some form of Dell software on top of that hardware for management purposes, which has always been a strong point for Dell. Losing the hardware means little to Dell if they have to lose profit margin to keep it there in the first place.

The second indicator of networking issues comes from comments from Michael Dell at EMCworld this year. Check out this short video featuring him with outgoing EMC CEO Joe Tucci:

Some of the telling comments in here involve Michael Dell’s praise for the NSX business model and how it is being adopted by a large number of other vendors in the industry. Also telling is their reaffirmation that Cisco is an important partnership in VCE and won’t be going away any time soon. While these two things don’t seem to be related on the surface, they both point to a truth Dell is trying hard to accept.

In the future, with overlay network virtualization models gaining traction in the data center, the underlying hardware will matter little. In almost every case, the hardware choice will come down to one of two options:

  1. Which switch is the cheapest?
  2. Which switch is on the Approved List?

That’s it. That’s the whole decision tree. No one will care what sticker is on the box. They will only care that it didn’t cost a fortune and that they won’t get fired for buying it. That’s bad for companies that aren’t making white boxes or named Cisco. Other network vendors are going to try and add value in some way, but the overlay sitting on top of those bells and whistles will make it next to impossible to differentiate in anything but software. Whether that’s superior management capabilities, open plug-in model, or some other thing we haven’t thought of will make no difference in the end. Software will still be king and the hardware will be an inexpensive pawn or a costly piece that has been pre-approved.

Whither Wireless?

The other big inflection point that makes me worry about the Dell networking story is the lack of movement in the wireless space. Dell has historically been a company to partner first and acquire second. But with HPE’s acquisition of Aruba Networks last year, the dominos in the wireless space are still waiting to fall. Brocade raced out to buy Ruckus. Meru offered itself on a platter to anyone that would buy them. Now Aerohive stands as the last independent wireless vendor without a dance partner. Yes, they’ve announced that they are partnering with Dell, but have you been to the Dell Wireless Networking page? Can you guess what the Dell W-series is? Here’s a hint: it rhymes with “Peruba”.

Every time Dell leads with a W-series deployment, they are effectively paying their biggest competitor. They are opening the door to allowing HPE/Aruba to come in and not only start talking about wireless but servers, storage, and other networking as well. Dell would do well at this point to start deemphasizing the W-series and start highlighting the “new generation” of Aerohive APs and how they are going to the be the focus moving forward.

The real solution would be for Dell to buy a wireless company and take all the wireless expertise they are selling in-house. That would show they are serious about both the campus network of the future and the data center network needed to support their other server and storage infrastructure. Sadly, with Dell being leveraged due to the privatization of his company just two years ago and mounting debt for this mega merger, Dell is looking to make cash with spin offs instead of spending it on yet another company to ingest and subsume. Which means a real non-partner wireless solution is still many years away.


Tom’s Take

Dell’s networking strategy is in maintenance mode. Make switches to support faster speeds for now, probably with Tomahawk support soon, and hope that this whole networking thing goes software sooner rather than later. Otherwise, the need to shore up the campus wireless areas along with the coming decision about showing support fully behind NSX and partnerships is going to be a bitter pill to swallow. Perhaps Dell Networking will exist as an option for companies wanting a 100% Dell solution? Or maybe they are waiting for a new offering from Dell/EMC in the data center to drive profits to research and development to keep pace with Cisco and Arista? One can only hope that their networking flower doesn’t wither on the vine.

Running Barefoot – Thoughts on Tofino and P4

barefootgrass

The big announcement this week is that Barefoot Networks leaped out of stealth mode and announced that they’re working on a very, very fast datacenter switch. The Barefoot Tofino can do up to 6.5 Tbps of throughput. That’s a pretty significant number. But what sets the Tofino apart is that it also uses the open source P4 programming language to configure the device for everything, from forwarding packets to making routing decisions. Here’s why that may be bigger than another fast switch.

Feature Presentation

Barefoot admits in their announcement post that one of the ways they were able to drive the performance of the Tofino platform higher was to remove a lot of the accumulated cruft that has been added to switch software for the past twenty years. For Barefoot, this is mostly about pushing P4 as the software component of their switch platform and driving adoption of it in a wider market.

Let’s take a look at what this really means for you. Modern network operating systems typically fall into one of two categories. The first is the “kitchen sink” system. This OS has every possible feature you could ever want built in at runtime. Sure, you get all the packet forwarding and routing features you need. But you also carry the legacy of frame relay, private VLANs, Spanning Tree, and a host of other things that were good ideas at one time and now mean little to nothing to you.

Worse yet, kitchen sink OSes require you to upgrade in big leaps to get singular features that you need but carry a whole bunch of others you don’t want. Need routing between SVIs? That’s an Advanced Services license. Sure, you get BGP with that license too, but will you ever use that in a wiring closet? Probably not. Too bad though, because it’s built into the system image and can’t be removed. Even newer operating systems like NX-OS have the same kitchen sink inclusion mentality. The feature may not be present at boot time, but a simple command turns it on. The code is still baked into the kernel, it’s just loaded as a module instead.

On the opposite end of the scale, you have newer operating systems like OpenSwitch. The idea behind OpenSwitch is to have a purpose built system that does a few things really, really well. OpenSwitch can build a datacenter fabric very quickly and make it perform well. But if you’re looking for additional features outside of that narrow set, you’re going to be out of luck. Sure, that means you don’t need a whole bunch of useless features. But what about things like OSPF or Spanning Tree? If you decide later that you’d like to have them, you either need to put in a request to have it built into the system or hope that someone else did and that the software will soon be released to you.

We Can Rebuild It

Barefoot is taking a different track with P4. Instead of delivering the entire OS for you in one binary image, they are allowing you to build the minimum number of pieces that you need to make it work for your applications. Unlike OpenSwitch, you don’t have to wait for other developers to build in a function that you need in order to deploy things. You drop to an IDE and write the code you need to forward packets in a specific way.

There are probably some people reading this post that are nodding their heads in agreement right now about this development process. That’s good for Barefoot. That means that their target audience wants functionality like this. But Barefoot isn’t for everyone. The small and medium enterprise isn’t going to jump at the chance to spend even more time programming forwarding engines into their switches. Sure, the performance profile is off the chart. But it’s also a bit like buying a pricy supercar to drive back and forth to the post office. Overkill for 98% of your needs.

Barefoot is going to do well in financial markets where speed is very important. They’re also going to sell into big development shops where the network team needs pared-down performance in software and a forwarding chip that can blow the doors off the rest of the network for East <-> West traffic flow. Give that we haven’t seen a price tag on Tofino just yet, I would imagine that it’s priced well into those markets and beyond the reach of a shop that just needs two leaf nodes and a spine to connect them. But that’s exactly what needs to happen.


Tom’s Take

Barefoot isn’t going to appeal to shops that plug in a power cable and run a command to provision a switch. Barefoot will shine where people can write code that will push a switch to peak performance and do amazing things. Perhaps Barefoot will start offering code later on that gives you the ability to program basic packet forwarding into a switch or routing functions when needed without the requirement of taking hours of classes on P4. But for the initial release, keeping Tofino in the hands of dev shops is a great idea. If for no other reason than to cut down on support costs.

The 25GbE Datacenter Pipeline

pipeline

SDN may have made networking more exciting thanks to making hardware less important than it has been in the past, but that’s not to say that hardware isn’t important at all. The certainty with which new hardware will come out and make things a little bit faster than before is right there with death and taxes. One of the big announcements yesterday from Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) during HPE Discover was support for a new 25GbE / 100GbE switch architecture built around the FlexFabric 5950 and 12900 products. This may be the tipping point for things.

The Speeds of the Many

I haven’t always been high on 25GbE. Almost two years ago I couldn’t see the point. Things haven’t gotten much different in the last 24 months from a speed perspective. So why the change now? What make this 25GbE offering any different than things from the nascent ideas presented by Arista?

First and foremost, the 25GbE released by HPE this week is based on the Broadcom Tomahawk chipset. When 25GbE was first presented, it was a collection of vendors trying to convince you to upgrade to their slightly faster Ethernet. But in the past two years, most of the merchant offerings on the market have coalesced around using Broadcom as the primary chipset. That means that odds are good your favorite switching platform is running Trident 2 or Trident 2+ under the hood.

With Broadcom backing the silicon, that means wider adoption of the specification. Why would anyone buy 25GbE from Brocade or Dell or HPE if the only vendor supporting it was that vendor of choice? If you can’t ever be certain that you’ll have support for the hardware in three or five years time, making an investment today seems silly. Broadcom’s backing means that eventually everyone will be adopting 25GbE.

Likewise, one of my other impediments to adoption was the lack of server NICs to ramp hosts to 25GbE. Having fast access ports means nothing if the severs can’t take advantage of them. HPE addressed this with the release of FlexFabric networking adapters that can run 25GbE Ethernet. More importantly, those adapters (and switches) can run at 10GbE as well. This means that adoption of higher bandwidth is no longer an all-or-nothing proposition. You don’t have to abandon your existing investment to get to 25GbE right away. You don’t have to build a lab pod to test things and then sneak it into production. You can just buy a 5950 today and clock the ports down to 10GbE while you await the availability and purchasing cycle to buy 25GbE NICs. Then you can flip some switches in the next maintenance window and be running at 25GbE speeds. And you can leave some ports enabled at 10GbE to ensure that there is maximum backwards compatibility.

The Needs of the Few

Odds are good that 25GbE isn’t going to be right for you today. HPE is even telling people that 25GbE only really makes sense in a few deployment scenarios, among which are large container-based hosts running thousands of virtual apps, flash storage arrays that use Ethernet as a backplane, or specialized high-performance computing (HPC) tricks with RDMA and such. That means the odds are good that you won’t need 25GbE first thing tomorrow morning.

However, the need for 25GbE is going to be there. As applications grow more bandwidth hungry and data centers keep shrinking in footprint, the network hardware you do have left needs to work harder and faster to accomplish more with less. If the network really is destined to become a faceless underlay that serves as a utility for applications, it needs to run flat out fast to ensure that developers can’t start blaming their utility company for problems. Multi-core server architectures and flash storage have solved two of the three legs of this problem. 25GbE host connectivity and the 100GbE backbone connectivity tied to it, solve the other side of the equation so everything balances properly.

Don’t look at 25GbE as an immediate panacea for your problems. Instead, put it on a timeline with your other server needs and see what the adoption rate looks like going forward. If server NICs are bought in large quantities, that will drive manufactures to push the technology onto the server boards. If there is enough need for connectivity at these speeds the switch vendors will start larger adoption of Tomahawk chipsets. That cycle will push things forward much faster than the 10GbE / 40GbE marathon that’s been going on for the past six years.


Tom’s Take

I think HPE is taking a big leap with 25GbE. Until the Dell/EMC merger is completed they won’t find themselves in a position to adopt Tomahawk quickly in the Force10 line. That means the need to grab 25GbE server NICs won’t materialize if there’s nothing to connect them. Cisco won’t care either way so long as switches are purchased and all other networking vendors don’t sell servers. So that leaves HPE to either push this forward to fall off the edge of the cliff. Time will tell how this will all work out, but it would be nice to see HPE get a win here and make the network the least of application developer problems.

Disclaimer

I was a guest of Hewlett Packard Enterprise for HPE Discover 2016. They paid for my travel, hotel, and meals during the event. While I was briefed on the solution discussed here and many others, there was no expectation of coverage of the topics discussed. HPE did not ask for, nor were they guaranteed any consideration in the writing of this article. The conclusions and analysis contained herein are mine and mine alone.

Flash Needs a Highway

CarLights

Last week at Storage Field Day 10, I got a chance to see Pure Storage and their new FlashBlade product. Storage is an interesting creature, especially now that we’ve got flash memory technology changing the way we think about high performance. Flash transformed the industry from slow spinning gyroscopes of rust into a flat out drag race to see who could provide enough input/output operations per second (IOPS) to get to the moon and back.

Take a look at this video about the hardware architecture behind FlashBlade:

It’s pretty impressive. Very fast flash storage on blades that can outrun just about anything on the market. But this post isn’t really about storage. It’s about transport.

Life Is A Network Highway

Look at the backplane of the FlashBlade chassis. It’s not something custom or even typical for a unit like that. The key is when the presenter says that the architecture of the unit is more like a blade server chassis than a traditional SAN. In essence, Pure has taken the concept of a midplane and used it very effectively here. But their choice of midplane is interesting in this case.

Pure is using the Broadcom Trident II switch as their networking midplane for FlashBlade. That’s pretty telling from a hardware perspective. Trident II runs a large majority of switches in the market today that are merchant silicon based. They are essentially becoming the Intel of the switch market. They are supplying arms to everyone that wants to build something quickly at low cost without doing any kind of custom research and development of their own silicon manufacturing.

Using a Trident II in the backplane of the FlashBlade means that Pure evaluated all the alternatives and found that putting something merchant-based in the midplane is cost effective and provides the performance profile necessary to meet the needs of flash storage. Saturating backplanes with IOPS can be accomplished. But as we learned from Coho Data, it takes a lot of CPU horsepower to create a flash storage system that can saturate 10Gig Ethernet links.

I Am Speed

Using Trident II as a midplane or backplane for devices like this has huge implications. First and foremost, networking technology has a proven track record. If Trident II wasn’t a stable and reliable platform, no one would have used it in their products. And given that almost everyone in the networking space has a Trident platform for sale, it speaks volumes about reliability.

Second, Trident II is available. Broadcom is throwing these units off the assembly line as fast as they can. That means that there’s no worry about silicon shortages or plant shutdowns or any one of a number of things that can affect custom manufacturing. Even if a company wants to look at a custom fabrication, it could take months or even years to bring things online. By going with a reference design like Trident II, you can have your software engineers doing the hard work of building a system to support your hardware. That speeds time to market.

Third, Trident is a modular platform. That part can’t be understated even though I think it wasn’t called out very much in the presentation from Pure. By having a midplane that is built as a removable module, it’s very easy to replace it should problems arise. That’s the point of field replaceable units (FRUs). But in today’s market, it’s just as easy to create a system that can run multiple different platforms as well. The blade chassis idea extends equally to both blades and mid or backplanes.

Imagine being able to order a Tomahawk-based controller unit for FlashBlade that only requires you to swap the units at the back of the system. Now, that investment in 10Gig blade connectivity with 40Gig uplinks just became 25Gig blade connectivity with 100Gig uplinks to the network. All for the cost of two network controller blades. There may be some software that needs to be written to make the transition smooth for the consumers in the system, but the hardware is more than capable of supporting a change like that.


Tom’s Take

I was thrilled to see Pure Storage building a storage platform that tightly integrates with networking the way that FlashBlade does. This is how the networking stack is going to be completely integrated with storage and compute. We should still look at things through the lens of APIs and programmability, but making networking and consistent transport layer for all things in the datacenter is a good start.

The funny thing about making something a consistent transport layer is that by design it has to be extensible. That means more and more folks are going to be driving those pieces into the network. Software can be created on top of this common transport to differentiate, much like we’re seeing with network operating systems right now. Even Pure was able to create a different kind of transport protocol to do the heavy lifting at low latency.

It’s funny that it took a presentation from a storage company to make me see the value of the network as something agnostic. Perhaps I just needed some perspective from the other side of the fence.

The Death of TRILL

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Networking has come a long way in the last few years. We’ve realized that hardware and ASICs aren’t the constant that we could rely on to make decisions in the next three to five years. We’ve thrown in with software and the quick development cycles that allow us to iterate and roll out new features weekly or even daily. But the hardware versus software battle has played out a little differently than we all expected. And the primary casualty of that battle was TRILL.

Symbiotic Relationship

Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) was proposed as a solution to the complexity of spanning tree. Radia Perlman realized that her bridging loop solution wouldn’t scale in modern networks. So she worked with the IEEE to solve the problem with TRILL. We also received Shortest Path Bridging (SPB) along the way as an alternative solution to the layer 2 issues with spanning tree. The motive was sound, but the industry has rejected the premise entirely.

Large layer 2 networks have all kinds of issues. ARP traffic, broadcast amplification, and many other numerous issues plague layer 2 when it tries to scale to multiple hundreds or a few thousand nodes. The general rule of thumb is that layer 2 broadcast networks should never get larger than 250-500 nodes lest problems start occurring. And in theory that works rather well. But in practice we have issues at the software level.

Applications are inherently complicated. Software written in the pre-Netflix era of public cloud adoption doesn’t like it when the underlay changes. So things like IP addresses and ARP entries were assumed to be static. If those data points change you have chaos in the software. That’s why we have vMotion.

At the core, vMotion is a way for software to mitigate hardware instability. As I outlined previously, we’ve been fixing hardware with software for a while now. vMotion could ensure that applications behaved properly when they needed to be moved to a different server or even a different data center. But they also required the network to be flat to overcome limitations in things like ARP or IP. And so we went on a merry journey of making data centers as flat as possible.

The problem came when we realized that data centers could only be so flat before they collapsed in on themselves. ARP and spanning tree limited the amount of traffic in layer 2 and those limits were impossible to overcome. Loops had to be prevented, yet the simplest solution disabled bandwidth needed to make things run smoothly. That caused IEEE and IETF to come up with their layer 2 solutions that used CLNS to solve loops. And it was a great idea in theory.

The Joining

In reality, hardware can’t be spun that fast. TRILL was used as a reference platform for proprietary protocols like FabricPath and VCS. All the important things were there but they were locked into hardware that couldn’t be easily integrated into other solutions. We found ourselves solving problem after problem in hardware.

Users became fed up. They started exploring other options. They finally decided that hardware wasn’t the answer. And so they looked to software. And that’s where we started seeing the emergence of overlay networking. Protocols like VXLAN and NV-GRE emerged to tunnel layer 2 packets over layer 3 networks. As Ivan Pepelnjak is fond of saying layer 3 transport solves all of the issues with scaling. And even the most unruly application behaves when it thinks everything is running on layer 2.

Protocols like VXLAN solved an immediate need. They removed limitations in hardware. Tunnels and fabrics used novel software approaches to solve insurmountable hardware problems. An elegant solution for a thorny problem. Now, instead of waiting for a new hardware spin to fix scaling issues, customers could deploy solutions to fix the issues inherent in hardware on their own schedule.

This is the moment where software defined networking (SDN) took hold of the market. Not when words like automation and orchestration started being thrown about. No, SDN became a real thing when it enabled customers to solve problems without buying more physical devices.


Tom’s Take

Looking back, we realize now that building large layer 2 networks wasn’t the best idea. We know that layer 3 scales much better. Given the number of providers and end users running BGP to top-of-rack (ToR) switches, it would seem that layer 3 scales much better. It took us too long to figure out that the best solution to a problem sometimes takes a bit of thought to implement.

Virtualization is always going to be limited by the infrastructure it’s running on. Applications are only as smart as the programmer. But we’ve reached the point where developers aren’t counting on having access to layer 2 protocols that solve stupid decision making. Instead, we have to understand that the most resilient way to fix problems is in the software. Whether that’s VXLAN, NV-GRE, or a real dev team not relying on the network to solve bad design decisions.

Intel and the Network Arms Race

IntelLogo

Networking is undergoing a huge transformation. Software is surely a huge driver for enabling technology to grow by leaps and bounds and increase functionality. But the hardware underneath is growing just as much. We don’t seem to notice as much because the port speeds we deal with on a regular basis haven’t gotten much faster than the specs we read about years go. But the chips behind the ports are where the real action is right now.

Fueling The Engines Of Forwarding

Intel has jumped into networking with both feet and is looking to land on someone. Their work on the Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) is helping developers write code that is highly portable across CPU architecture. We used to deal with specific microprocessors in unique configurations. A good example is Dynamips.

Most everyone is familiar with this program or the projects that spawned, Dynagen and GNS3. Dynamips worked at first because it emulated the MIPS processor found in Cisco 7200 routers. It just happened that the software used the same code for those routers all the way up to the first releases of the 15.x train. Dynamips allowed for the emulation of Cisco router software but it was very, very slow. It almost didn’t allow for packets to be processed. And most of the advanced switching features didn’t work at all thanks to ASICs.

Running networking code on generic x86 processors doesn’t provide the kinds of performance that you need in a network switching millions of packets per second. That’s why DPDK is helping developers accelerate their network packet forward to approach the levels of custom ASICs. This means that a company could write software for a switch using Intel CPUs as the base of the system and expect to get good performance out of it.

Not only can you write code that’s almost as good as the custom stuff network vendors are creating, but you can also have a relative assurance that the code will be portable. Look at the pfSense project. It can run on some very basic hardware. But the same code can also run on a Xeon if you happen to have one of those lying around. That performance boost means a lot more packet switching and processing. No modifications to the code needed. That’s a powerful way to make sure that your operating system doesn’t need radical modifications to work across a variety of platforms, from SMB and ROBO all the way to an enterprise core device.

Fighting The Good Fight

The other reason behind Intel’s drive to get DPDK to everyone is to fight off the advances of Broadcom. It used to be that the term merchant silicon meant using off-the-shelf parts instead of rolling your own chips. Now, it means “anything made by Broadcom that we bought instead of making”. Look at your favorite switching vendor and the odds are better than average that the chipset inside their most popular switches is a Broadcom Trident, Trident 2, or even a Tomahawk. Yes, even the Cisco Nexus 9000 runs on Broadcom.

Broadcom is working their way to the position of arms dealer to the networking world. It soon won’t matter what switch wins because they will all be the same. That’s part of the reason for the major differentiation in software recently. If you have the same engine powering all the switches, your performance is limited by that engine. You also have to find a way to make yourself stand out when everything on the market has the exact same packet forwarding specs.

Intel knows how powerful it is to become the arms dealer in a market. They own the desktop, laptop, and server market space. Their only real competition is AMD, and one could be forgiven for arguing that the only reason AMD hasn’t gone under yet is through a combination of video card sales and Intel making sure they won’t get in trouble for having a monopoly. But Intel also knows what it feels like to miss the boat on a chip transition. Intel missed the mobile device market, which is now ruled by ARM and custom SoC manufacturing. Intel needs to pull off a win in the networking space with DPDK to ensure that the switches running in the data center tomorrow are powered by x86, not Broadcom.


Tom’s Take

Intel’s on the right track to make some gains in networking. Their new Xeon chips with lots and lots of cores can do parallel processing of workloads. Their contributions to CoreOS will help the accelerate the adoption of containers, which are becoming a standard part of development. But the real value for Intel is helping developers create portable networking code that can be deployed on a variety of devices. That enables all kinds of new things to come, from system scaling to cloud deployment and beyond.

Will Cisco Shine On?

Digital Lights

Cisco announced their new Digital Ceiling initiative today at Cisco Live Berlin. Here’s the marketing part:

And here’s the breakdown of protocols and stuff:

Funny enough, here’s a presentation from just three weeks ago at Networking Field Day 11 on a very similar subject:

Cisco is moving into Internet of Things (IoT) big time. They have at least learned that the consumer side of IoT isn’t a fun space to play in. With the growth of cloud connectivity and other things on that side of the market, Cisco knows that is an uphill battle not worth fighting. Seems they’ve learned from Linksys and Flip Video. Instead, they are tracking the industrial side of the house. That means trying to break into some networks that are very well put together today, even if they aren’t exactly Internet-enabled.

Digital Ceiling isn’t just about the PoE lighting that was announced today. It’s a framework that allows all other kinds of dumb devices to be configured and attached to networks that have intelligence built in. The Constrained Application Protocol (CoaP) is designed in such a way as to provide data about a great number of devices, not just lights. Yet lights are the launch “thing” for this line. And it could be lights out for Cisco.

A Light In The Dark

Cisco wants in on the possibility that PoE lighting will be a huge market. No other networking vendor that I know of is moving into the market. The other building automation company has the manufacturing chops to try and pull off an entire connected infrastructure for lighting. But lighting isn’t something to take lightly (pun intended).

There’s a lot that goes into proper lighting planning. Locations of fixtures and power levels for devices aren’t accidents. It requires a lot of planning and preparation. Plan and prep means there are teams of architects and others that have formulas and other knowledge on where to put them. Those people don’t work on the networking team. Any changes to the lighting plan are going to require input from these folks to make sure the illumination patterns don’t change. It’s not exactly like changing a lightbulb.

The other thing that is going to cause problems is the electrician’s union. These guys are trained and certified to put in anything that has power running to it. They aren’t just going to step aside and let untrained networking people start pulling down light fixtures and put up something new. Finding out that there are new 60-watt LED lights in a building that they didn’t put up is going to cause concern and require lots of investigation to find out if it’s even legal in certain areas for non-union, non-certified employees to install things that are only done by electricians now.

The next item of concern is the fact that you now have two parallel networks running in the building. Because everyone that I’ve talked to about PoE Lighting and Digital Ceiling has had the same response: Not On My Network. The switching infrastructure may be the same, but the location of the closets is different. The requirements of the switches are different. And the air gap between the networks is crucial to avoid any attackers compromising your lighting infrastructure and using it as an on-ramp into causing problems for your production data network.

The last issue in my mind is the least technically challenging, but the most concerning from the standpoint of longevity of the product line – Where’s the value in PoE lighting? Every piece of collateral I’ve seen and every person I’ve heard talk about it comes back to the same points. According to the experts, it’s effectively the same cost to install intelligent PoE lighting as it is to stick with traditional offerings. But that “effective” word makes me think of things like Tesla’s “Effective Lease Payment”.

By saying “effective”, what Cisco is telling you is that the up-front cost of a Digital Ceiling deployment is likely to be expensive. That large initial number comes down by things like electricity cost savings and increased efficiencies or any one of another of clever things that we tell each other to pretend that it doesn’t cost lots of money to buy new things. It’s important to note that you should evaluate the cost of a Digital Ceiling deployment completely on its own before you start taking into account any kind of cost savings in an equation that come months or years from now.


Tom’s Take

I’m not sure where IoT is going. There’s a lot of learning that needs to happen before I feel totally comfortable talking about the pros and cons of having billions of devices connected and talking to each other. But in this time of baby steps toward solutions, I can honestly say that I’m not entirely sold on Digital Ceiling. It’s clever. It’s catchy. But it ultimately feels like Cisco is headed down a path that will lead to ruin. If they can get CoAP working on many other devices and start building frameworks and security around all these devices then there is a chance that they can create a lasting line of products that will help them capitalize on the potential of IoT. What worries me is that this foray into a new realm will be fraught with bad decisions and compromises and eventually we’ll fondly remember Digital Ceiling as yet another Cisco product that had potential and not much else.